Menu Fermer

Le jardin et le verger fruitiers en avril

April contents:  Sour Cherry ‘Oblacinska’ – an Easy to Grow, Delicious and Healthy Fruit….  An Historic Treasure rediscovered! Pyrus communis ‘Blood Pear’….. The importance of pollinators……Thinning peaches and apricots vital for good crops……Dwarf Cherries?- I don’t think so!….. What kinds of fruit can you grow in a north-facing site?…. Tunnel fruits – grapes, strawberries and figs…. Other fruit jobs…..

 Pink staining at the base of sour cherry Oblacinska blossom indicating that it has been pollinated
 Pink staining at the base of sour cherry Oblacinska blossom indicating that it has been pollinated


« In this Month your Garden appears in it’s greatest Beauty, the Blossoms of the Fruit-trees prognosticate the plenty of Fruits for all the succeeding Summer Months, unless prevented by untimely Frosts or Blights. The bees now buzz in every corner…. to seek for food: the Birds sing in every Bush and the sweet Nightingale tunes her warbling Notes in your solitary Walks, whilst the other Birds are at their rest….. The air is Wholesome, and the Earth pleasant, beginning now to be clothed with Nature’s best Array, exceeding all Art’s Glory. » – (Worlidge, 1688)  


How I love the quote above!  How pristine and beautiful that relatively unspoiled countryside must have been. What a stark contrast to our countryside now! How much I would love to have seen it. I often long for a time machine, so that I could go back and see the abundant, unspoiled beauty of that world before we modern humans destroyed so much of it in our ignorance. I was lucky to see perhaps what were some of the last remnants of it as a child growing up in the country in the 50’s and 60’s. There are no nightingales here sadly – but one of the most wonderful things about growing fruit, especially tree-fruits which have to be propagated from descendants of the original trees, is that we can all grow that continuing history in our gardens. We can all touch what in fact are merely extensions of the branches of those many original  apple, pear or plum varieties which gardeners down through the centuries have tended lovingly – bequeathing them to us – to pass on in turn to our descendants. However, there are many more modern varieties, which are equally good – or perhaps even better, in some cases?  And their blossom certainly is every bit as beautiful, as you can see from the picture of sour cherry ‘Oblacinska’ above – even more so when I can see that they’ve been pollinated from the pink staining at the base of the white petals, and I’m anticipating such deliciousness to look forward to!


Sour Cherry ‘Oblacinska’ – an Easy to Grow, Delicious and healthy Fruit


One of the few ‘upsides’ of global trade is that we are now able to avail of many good varieties of fruit varieties from further afield, which may not have been available to our gardening forbears – like the wonderful Sour Cherry ‘Oblacinska’ from Serbia pictured above in bloom. I bought 2 trees of it in of all places, discount supermarket Lidl five years ago!  Just like the peaches I bought there 12 years ago now, they were so cheap that I just couldn’t resist trying them at only €5 euros each, and I’ve been so pleased with them since!  As sour cherries are happy on a north-facing wall – I planted them on the back wall of the stables, facing the entrance to the polytunnels, hoping that I might be better able to protect them there. As sour cherries fruit on the previous year’s green wood – just as peaches do – this means that they are far easier to keep under control by annual pruning than sweet cherries, which I’ve finally given up on! Sweet cherries are so vigorous even on the so-called ‘dwarfing’ (ha!) rootstocks without constant attention pinching back and pruning, which I don’t have time for – they become too big very quickly and totally out of control!  This year the blossom on the sour cherries has been spectacular, and having been assiduously pollinated by a wide range of Bumblebees – are now promising a huge crop this year, all being well, as you can see above. All I have to do now is keep the birds away to ensure that WE get the crop instead of the birds – but I have a cunning plan for that which I’ll elucidate in a month or so!  My mouth waters at the very thought of their deliciously tart berries – which aren’t sour at all if they are allowed to ripen to dark red, and the extra hint of acidity gives them a far richer taste than any sweet cherry.


Tart cherries are rich in health-promoting, anti-inflammatory polyphenols, and have been found to have several beneficial health effects, including lowering blood pressure, improving brain function, protecting against oxidative stress and reducing inflammation generally. All that and they not only look so decorative that I almost can’t bear to pick them – and they taste gorgeous too!  Other studies have found that freezing them makes the healthy phytochemicals in them more bioavailable to our digestive system. So they’re perfect for anyone who grows and freezes their own produce, and you will never see them for sale anywhere. Their juice is available in some health food shops – at an exorbitant price! Far better to have your own anyway – along with all the other nutrients and fibre which the whole fruit contains.


An Historic Treasure Rediscovered – Pyrus communis ‘Blood Pear’  


Pyrus communis 'Blood Pear' - an historic treasure rediscovered!

&#13 ;

Pyrus communis « Poire de sang » – un trésor historique et fabuleux redécouvert !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Il y a quelques années, je me promenais dans le Orchard Garden Centre à Celbridge, quelque part où je vais de temps en temps si je suis dans cette région, car ils ont toujours une excellente gamme de plantes, et souvent certains des fruits les moins «  run of the mill '' . Je ne cherchais vraiment plus de fruits d'arbre, car j'en ai plus qu'assez – étant un «  pomoholic '' – avec plus de 100 variétés de pommes et une douzaine de poires ici, que j'ai ramassées progressivement au fil des ans! Alors que je passais devant les pommes et les poires, quelque chose à la périphérie de ma vision a attiré mon attention. Je ne sais pas vraiment pourquoi – comme les arbres que je regardais semblaient assez similaires au début à tous les autres poiriers parmi lesquels ils se tenaient – mais il y avait juste quelque chose à leur sujet. Quand j'ai regardé de plus près – j'ai repéré que deux arbres, légèrement plus grands, avaient plusieurs petits fruits – inhabituel pour le stock de jardinerie standard, car normalement ils sont vendus comme des arbres d'un ou deux ans qui n'ont pas encore commencé à fructifier. J'ai demandé à Adrian, le directeur, s'ils avaient été pulvérisés récemment, et il a répondu que non – qu'ils n'avaient jamais pulvérisé les arbres eux-mêmes et qu'ils avaient ces arbres en stock depuis au moins deux ans, car personne ne semblait intéressé par eux. Il ne savait rien d'eux, mais pensait qu'il s'agissait d'une variété ornementale, car ils avaient une belle couleur d'automne. J'ai demandé si je pouvais juste choisir un fruit pour l'essayer ………. Eh bien les gens – ils attendaient évidemment juste pour moi!




Let me tell you – bigger is not always necessarily better! Biting into what I expected might be a hard, bitter, dry fruit of an ornamental or perry pear, I was astonished when my rather tentative bite revealed the most beautiful crimson-flushed flesh, with a deliciously sweet flavour!  In fact I was completely stunned – it was like no pear I’d ever seen before!  Adrian said that it was called  ‘Blood Pear’, and that he’d got it a few years ago from a small Irish grower who was into unusual ornamental trees, whose name he couldn’t remember at the time, and who had got it from another nursery!  Not very helpful!


I thought that the pear’s name ‘Blood Pear’ seemed possibly either very unlikely – or very ancient, so when I got home I looked in all my old fruit books and catalogues – of which I have many! That search drew a complete blank. But thank heavens for the internet – despite it’s drawbacks – it is a real blessing sometimes! The more I researched this unusually-named variety – the more excited I became!  Lo and behold, I found it listed in ‘The Perry Pears of Gloucestershire’ – an enthusiast’s book written by none other than the incredibly knowledgeable Charles Martell (of Stinking Bishop’ cheese fame) – who recently featured on BBC’s Countryfile TV series – and who I knew also just happens to be a very close neighbour of my favourite cousin in Herefordshire!  So I emailed the always helpful Charles to ask if he knew of anyone who was propagating it, as at that stage I still didn’t know the name of the Irish grower who Orchard Garden centre had obtained it from..


Charles’ beautiful book and my own further exhaustive research revealed that this incredibly rare Heritage pear was first recorded in 1675 in France – then 1684 in Germany – before Worlidge uttered those wonderful words which I’ve quoted above – but it may quite possibly be Medieval or even earlier.  It is, as I suspected, an ancient variety, with it’s origins lost in the mists of time, which was recently rediscovered in Hasfield, in Gloucestershire. Hasfield is just a few miles away from where my cousin farms on the edge of the Forest of Dean – an area where I spent a lot of time in my youth and am very fond of. Apparently now a favourite in the National Pear collection, it bears slightly smaller than average fruits that have a rose-flushed skin when fully ripe, but the really exciting thing about this absolute treasure is the meltingly sweet, ruby-flushed flesh revealed when biting into the conveniently child-sized fruits. Their complex flavour is very hard to describe – the one or two European nurseries which have it listed describe it as being fragrant, with almost muscat or watermelon-flavoured fruits, having overtones of cinnamon. The colour and those complex flavours clearly show it’s high content of aromatic, antioxidant polyphenols, something which regular readers will know I’ve been interested in for many years. 


It ripens in early August, ahead of many dessert pears, which is useful, and is absolutely delicious eaten fresh straight from the tree. It can be stored for 3-4 weeks in cool storage, can also be cooked, and the fruits dehydrate exceptionally well into deliciously-flavoured pear sweetmeats, which I discovered are especially good with a Brie-type cheese – like ‘Stinking Bishop’ oddly enough!  I recently heard of someone even making a pink sparkling Perry from this pear – I would really love to try doing that!  I could be wrong, but I think one might need to combine it with a perry pear which has a bit more sharpness, to make a really good balanced Perry – if making Perry is anything like making cider?  It certainly would be an interesting drink to try though. Perry is not something I’ve ever tried making – but I think I may just be ordering one or two Perry pear trees in the autumn. Pears will take a bit more of a damp climate than apples – so they should be happy enough here in Ireland! My Blood Pears certainly seem to be very happy anyway! 


This beautiful pear is a real find – and an absolute treasure for lovers of unusual fruit. It is hardy, disease-resistant and crops prolifically. It is self-fertile, but will crop even better with another pear such as ‘Conference’ nearby to aid pollination. The large flowers are very ornamental in spring, and it has beautiful autumn colour – which is a reason I would certainly grow it even if it didn’t have such unusual fruit!  I know some of you may laugh at me for saying this, as normally I’m a very practical person and don’t often talk about my more fanciful imaginings – but I swear that those trees – which originated so close to where my family’s roots go back hundreds of years, might have been connecting or communicating with me in some way through the ether – who knows?  My late very ‘fey’ aunt – the eldest of my father’s 6 sisters, my favourite cousin’s mother and more like a mother to me also – could have put it into words so eloquently. She could read my mind which was pretty scary at times!  But all I can say is – « There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamed of in your philosophy »  – to quote Shakespeare’s Hamlet. It is so true – there is still so much left to discover which is as yet unexplained, given the inadequate scientific knowledge or indeed language which we currently have. I often go and talk to my new trees, which came from that area of countryside which I love so much. When I stroke them – I almost imagine I can feel that connection to the soil where I know my roots still are……….  


One of the very few positives about my broken ankle last year was a bit more time to do research into what interests me.  Microbiology has always fascinated me, and now is a rapidly-emerging field of science. More evidence of the complexity of bacterial communication is being discovered daily – and the more I learn about it – the more utterly astonishing things I discover!  Gut feeling has already been well-documented and scientifically proven as valid. Which one of us hasn’t at some time experienced those tell-tale ‘butterflies’ in the stomach when worried or excited by something?  Or that ‘flip’ in the pit of the stomach when attracted to someone (- not always a good thing)!   Recently a lot more science is emerging not just about how our gut microbes can also actually control our emotions, by direct communication with our brain – but also how our diet can influence that for good or bad.  So perhaps our gut bacteria may even be able to recognise some kind of familiarity in other individuals of a similar bacterial heritage or background?  I know that there is definitely evidence of that in birds. 


Recently I was researching why it was, that despite the fact that the 3 different hybrid breeds of day old chicks I bought in December had been hatched on the same day, in the same hatchery, traveled home here in the same box and lived altogether in the very same quarters from day one – the 3 different hybrid strains have from the very beginning tended to gravitate towards their own breed in very distinct groups!  It’s quite uncanny! There is definitely something which they somehow inherently recognise in each other. This is something which I’ve found astonishing in creatures that one normally thinks of as just  ‘chickens’ – and not something that I would have ever noticed before in chickens. Naturally that is because I would normally have bought all the same breed when I reared them for commercial laying-hens years ago. I got the 3 different breed this time, as I though they would be a more attractive and entertaining flock – not something one would worry about when keeping a large commercial flock. This is the first time I’ve raised three different hybrids all hatched on the same day.  So that proves that it’s not all about scent – if it is at all.  Is it possible that they sense some kind of recognisable, inherited bacterial signature?  Scientists aren’t quite sure yet – again it’s a very new idea that they are only just beginning to research.  One thing is for certain – we all originally came from microbes – we are still full of them, and enveloped by them. How many more fascinating things there are still to discover!  Anyway – before I ramble off into more ‘what if’s’  and bore the pants off you all – back to the more practical matters of fruit!  Although, come to think of it – microbes are relevant to fruit too – just as they are to everything other living thing on the planet, including precious pollinating insects!


L’importance des pollinisateurs

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Bee on peach blossom in the polytunnelÀ l’époque de Worlidge, au XVIIe siècle, on pouvait considérer la prévisibilité des saisons comme allant de soi. À l’époque, les jardiniers pouvaient également tenir pour acquis qu’il y aurait toujours beaucoup d’abeilles et d’autres pollinisateurs chaque année pour polliniser nos arbres fruitiers et d’autres cultures importantes. Malheureusement, nos saisons deviennent maintenant assez imprévisibles et le nombre d’abeilles diminue rapidement partout, principalement à cause des pesticides qui endommagent les insectes et de la perte d’habitat, mais aussi à cause des conditions météorologiques erratiques dues au changement climatique. Il est dans notre intérêt de faire tout notre possible pour aider tous les pollinisateurs dès maintenant, pour essayer de stopper ce déclin, en fournissant différents habitats pour l’hivernage et la reproduction, avec des fleurs pour le nectar et le pollen – et en n’utilisant aucun pesticide. Je n’en ai pas utilisé depuis plus de 40 ans que je cultive des aliments biologiques – ils sont totalement inutiles. Des conditions de culture correctes et l’encouragement de la biodiversité, dans un environnement avec un bon équilibre entre les parasites et les prédateurs, sont la clé d’une culture sans pesticides ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Si les abeilles et d’autres insectes pollinisateurs d’importance vitale disparaissent, il en sera de même pour toutes les cultures vivrières qu’elles pollinisent, y compris les pêches représentées ici. C’est une grande partie de notre alimentation quotidienne – et nous ne durerions pas longtemps sans elles ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Apricot fruitlets developing on the dwarf potted trees. Now for thinning!&#13 ;

Des petits fruits d’abricot se développent sur les arbres nains en pot. Et maintenant, l’éclaircissage !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Heureusement, certaines nuits glaciales, au cours des derniers jours ensoleillés, il semble y avoir un certain nombre d’espèces différentes de bourdons et d’abeilles solitaires dans le jardin et les tunnels. Hier, les tunnels étaient le centre de l’abeille ! Il y en avait des masses à l’intérieur, pollinisant les dernières pêches, abricots et nectarines naines dans le tunnel (fruitier) ouest, et profitant de toutes les fleurs dans les deux tunnels, dont certaines que je cultive spécialement pour elles. Le temps chaud et sec de l’été dernier leur a fait du bien à nouveau et, malgré le fait que nous soyons entourés d’une agriculture intensive et d’une grande destruction de l’habitat, j’aime à penser que tout le travail que j’ai accompli ici au cours des 30 dernières années environ pour fournir un grand nombre d’habitats différents aux abeilles et aux insectes porte maintenant ses fruits. En particulier la banque B&B, comme je l’appelle, qui est bien drainée et qui semble avoir connu un grand succès, avec tant de nids d’abeilles que j’ai dû arrêter de la nettoyer l’autre jour. Des bourdons agités volaient partout autour de moi alors que j’essayais de nettoyer un peu les herbes les plus dures. Je les ai donc laissés faire et je me suis résigné à le faire en regardant ce que certains jardiniers très ordonnés considéreraient comme un désordre. En fait, mon jardin a été planté il y a plus de 30 ans en pensant à la vie sauvage, car les insectes, les guêpes et les abeilles sont les meilleurs amis du jardinier bio. Ils ne se contentent pas d’effectuer une précieuse pollinisation, mais ils assurent également une lutte vitale contre les parasites, comme la nature l’a voulu.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Apple blossom 'James Grieve'Fleur de pommier – ‘James Grieve’&#13 ;
Beaucoup de gens ne savent pas que les abeilles, les papillons de nuit et autres insectes pollinisateurs n’ont pas seulement besoin de fleurs pour se nourrir, mais aussi d’herbes, de berges sèches, de feuilles et de tas de bois pour nicher et s’abriter pendant l’hiver. Un ami m’a dit l’autre jour que le programme « Glas » destiné aux agriculteurs de la région comprend un module sur l’attraction des insectes pollinisateurs et des abeilles solitaires – c’est donc une très bonne nouvelle. Bien que nous l’ayons laissé aussi tard que possible, pour permettre aux abeilles d’hiberner, je me suis sentie plutôt coupable lorsque nous avons fauché les bandes à travers la prairie sauvage à cette époque, il y a trois ans, avant de planter le nouveau verger. Un certain nombre d’abeilles sont sorties en rampant des hautes touffes d’herbe – mais les bandes ne font qu’un mètre et demi de large – je laisse le reste de l’herbe brute avec ses fleurs sauvages – il y a donc beaucoup d’habitat dans lequel elles peuvent retourner en rampant. Je vais également planter beaucoup plus de fleurs sauvages de prairie entre les arbres pour leur fournir encore plus de nourriture et pour attirer de nombreux pollinisateurs, afin que nos arbres soient bien pollinisés. Pour l’instant, le nouveau verger se porte bien et nous avons encore eu une bonne récolte l’année dernière& ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il y a beaucoup de bourdons mais encore très peu d’abeilles noires indigènes dans les environs pour le moment – en général, les chatons des saules en sont étouffés à cette époque de l’année. Il semble que j’en vois de moins en moins chaque année, ce qui est vraiment inquiétant. J’ai remarqué quelques pissenlits sur la route, et j’ai été ravi de les voir. Mais je sais qu’il y a aussi beaucoup de fleurs dans le tunnel pour eux en ce moment. L’odeur quand j’ouvre les portes du polytunnel le matin à cette époque de l’année est toujours étonnante – ça sent comme dans une parfumerie ! Il y a aussi beaucoup de mouches volantes dans les environs ces derniers jours. Ils ne sont pas seulement d’excellents antiparasitaires – ils dévorent les pucerons – mais aussi d’excellents pollinisateurs. Cela montre une fois de plus l’importance de la culture des fleurs dans votre tunnel, au cas où quelqu’un penserait que c’est un gaspillage d’espace, ou un peu « girly » ! Il est également important de cultiver des fleurs à l’extérieur, autour de vos zones fruitières ou dans les vergers. Ainsi, les abeilles pollinisatrices et les autres insectes sauront où se trouve leur nourriture et ils seront si intelligents qu’ils se souviendront de l’endroit où elle se trouve, ce qui leur permettra de continuer à faire leur travail et d’obtenir d’autres fruits pour vous aussi ! Nous espérons que nous pourrons profiter d’un nouvel été riche en fruits délicieux. Les abeilles et les syrphes ont fait un bon travail de pollinisation des pêches et des abricots précoces, et ils doivent gonfler rapidement ! J’espère pouvoir me rendre aux tunnels en quelques semaines pour essayer d’éclaircir les plus bas que je peux atteindre – car l’éclaircissement est vital si vous voulez des fruits de taille décente& ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

L’éclaircissage des pêches et des abricots est vital pour de bonnes récoltes

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Developing peach fruitlets in tunnelLes petits fruits de la pêche et de l’abricot présentés ici, qui ont à peu près la taille de gros pois, devront être éclaircis dès qu’ils auront atteint la taille d’un petit pois, et être à nouveau éclaircis dans quelques semaines lorsqu’ils auront la taille d’une noix, en les laissant éventuellement séparés d’au moins 10 cm. C’est un travail délicat que je déteste vraiment – surtout maintenant que je n’ai qu’un seul bras qui dépasse la hauteur de l’épaule depuis que je me suis cassé l’épaule droite il y a 5 ans ! Je ne supporte pas d’arracher tous ces petits bébés à fourrure – ce fruit potentiel – mais je dois m’endurcir, car sinon je sais qu’ils ne se développeront pas correctement ! La plupart jauniront et tomberont, car l’arbre ne peut pas en supporter autant. En éclaircissant, vous arrêtez la chute des fruits et ceux qui restent se développent correctement pour atteindre leur taille maximale. C’est un travail difficile de faire tout cet éclaircissage, mais je me félicite lorsque je croque dans cette première délicieuse pêche vraiment mûre et que le jus coule sur mon menton. Ce seront des pêches pour le petit déjeuner pendant plusieurs semaines en été ! Les pêches d’extérieur ont deux ou trois semaines de retard, alors si vous avez des fleurs maintenant, protégez-les la nuit avec une toison si vous prévoyez de fortes gelées.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Des cerises naines ? Je ne pense pas ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La plupart des années, les cerises entrent en floraison à la fin du mois. Les cerises naines (ha-ha !) « Stella » ont été les premiers arbres fruitiers à être plantés dans le jardin il y a 36 ans, sous forme de petits bâtons de moins de deux pieds de haut, dans un champ par ailleurs dénudé. Aujourd’hui, lorsqu’ils sont en pleine floraison, ils ressemblent à une belle cathédrale de fleurs et sont aussi hauts que la maison ! Pas naines malheureusement – mais elles valent quand même la peine d’être cultivées pour leur floraison – et les oiseaux apprécient naturellement tous les fruits ! Ils peuvent l’atteindre – pas moi ! Assis devant mon ordinateur, je peux voir par-dessus la demi-porte de la cuisine, par la porte de la cour et tout droit en bas de ce que j’ai appelé assez pompeusement la « promenade des cerises ». Les arbres devraient être littéralement en fleurs dans deux semaines. Ils sont sous-plantés de bulbes, d’hellébores, de primevères et d’une multitude d’autres fleurs printanières qui aiment l’ombre, ce qui en fait un spectacle merveilleux chaque année ! Elles fructifient abondamment, mais je n’ai presque jamais plus d’une ou deux délicieuses cerises, ce sont les oiseaux qui en profitent, car elles sont bien trop hautes pour être couvertes. Même si je le pouvais, les merles de ce jardin semblent être particulièrement ingénieux et déterminés, quoi que j’essaie de faire pour les en dissuader. J’ai même essayé de couvrir certaines branches inférieures avec de vieux collants avant que les cerises ne commencent à se colorer (ce n’est pas la plus belle décoration de jardin !), mais mes merles ne se laissent pas berner par un peu de vieux collants, ils les picorent juste à travers les collants et les ruinent quand même ! Certains disent que c’est parce qu’ils pourraient avoir soif – mais il y a toujours de l’eau en abondance ici pour qu’ils puissent boire et cela ne les arrête pas. Je dois donc me contenter d’un ou deux de mes fruits préférés – si j’ai beaucoup de chance. Cependant, je suppose qu’il y a une petite compensation sous la forme de chants d’oiseaux mélodieux pendant une grande partie de l’année. En ce moment, je peux les entendre rivaliser avec les grives, les chardonnerets et les pinsons pour le « meilleur chant de printemps de 2018 » ! Un concert joyeux – bien qu’assez coûteux grâce à certains d’entre eux – si l’on compte le coût des cerises !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Blue Sky Cherry BlossomIl y a dix ans, j’ai fait un nouvel essai, en achetant d’autres cerisiers sur un nouveau porte-greffe extra-nain, Gisela, dont on parle beaucoup. Malheureusement, il ne semble pas plus nain que les autres, mais peut-être qu’avec une attention et une taille constantes, pour lesquelles je n’ai pas le temps, cela pourrait fonctionner ? Ils sont tout aussi vigoureux que les autres ! Il y a 3 ans, j’ai investi dans des arbres fruitiers plus nains, cette fois-ci pour les faire pousser en permanence dans des pots. Je les fais pousser dans mon tunnel à fruits, pour qu’ils attirent plus d’attention lors de l’arrosage, etc. et qu’ils soient également protégés des oiseaux affamés – j’espère donc pouvoir enfin profiter de plus d’une ou deux cerises ! Il y a quelques années, j’ai eu l’idée de placer des sacs en filet vides autour de nombreuses branches fructifères des arbres à l’extérieur, avec un certain succès, mais ils sont trop difficiles à atteindre maintenant ! Les seules cerises que je serai vraiment sûr d’atteindre à l’extérieur sont les griottes, ou cerises acides – les bourgeons promettent une grosse récolte sur des arbres encore assez petits &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Autres emplois dans le secteur des fruits

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Vous pouvez maintenant planter tous les types de fruits à partir de conteneurs, car il est trop tard pour la plantation à racines nues. Assurez-vous qu’il s’agit de jeunes plantes agréables, et non pas de plantes en pot, car elles sont plus difficiles à établir. Taquinez doucement quelques racines qui se détachent du fond au moment de la plantation, pour qu’ils comprennent bien. Veillez à ce que le point de greffe des arbres fruitiers se trouve à au moins 10 cm au-dessus du sol. Je vois souvent des arbres en pot dans les jardineries avec des greffons pratiquement dans le compost – c’est un désastre qui attend les ignorants. Si la partie supérieure de l’arbre fruitier dépasse le porte-greffe nain, comme cela peut arriver s’il est trop proche du niveau du sol, alors l’effet nain du porte-greffe est complètement perdu ! N’oubliez pas que si l’espace est restreint, vous pouvez également planter toutes sortes de fruits dans des conteneurs ! Si vous avez un sol au pH élevé (calcaire), c’est en fait la meilleure façon de cultiver des myrtilles acidophiles, en arrosant toujours les myrtilles avec de l’eau de pluie, mais jamais avec de l’eau du robinet si vous êtes dans une zone où l’eau est dure. C’est là que tant de gens se trompent&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Vous pouvez également tailler pour former de jeunes arbres formés de fruits à noyau comme les prunes et les cerises, maintenant que la sève monte. S’ils sont taillés en hiver, ils risquent de développer des « feuilles argentées » ou des chancres bactériens &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Surveillez les feuilles de cassis, de groseille et de groseille à maquereau qui commencent à ressembler à de la dentelle – de petits trous apparaissant entre les nervures des feuilles. Cela est dû aux chenilles de la tenthrède de la groseille à maquereau. C’est souvent un problème sur les jeunes arbustes achetés récemment dans les pépinières, car il semble y être endémique ! La meilleure façon de faire face à ce problème est de ne pas pulvériser ! Il suffit d’écraser le plus vite possible les chenilles que vous trouvez et, si vous avez de la place, de mettre une clôture temporaire en grillage autour de votre parcelle de groseilles et de prendre quelques poulets ou même des bantams pour les gratter pendant l’hiver et ramasser les œufs et les larves – c’est comme ça que je m’en suis débarrassé. Un peu plus de protéines pour produire de beaux œufs pour vous ! Les cassis, en particulier, apprécieront l’azote supplémentaire que leur apporteront les déjections des poules – et je peux vous garantir que vous n’aurez plus de problème avec la mouche à scie. Assurez-vous simplement de déplacer les poulets au printemps, avant que les buissons ne commencent à fructifier, sinon vous n’aurez pas de fruits non plus!!&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Nourrissez et paillez tous les arbres et buissons fruitiers si vous ne l’avez pas déjà fait. Si vous disposez de cendres de bois provenant d’un poêle à bois, tous les fruits, en particulier les pommes et les poires, apprécieront la potasse hautement soluble et fructifiante qu’elle fournit – mais pas les myrtilles, car elles augmentent le « ph » du sol – et utiliseront de la farine d’algues et/ou du paillis de consoude. Les arbres et les arbustes fruitiers en conteneurs apprécieront également un engrais organique à usage général pour les fruits et un paillis pour préserver l’humidité au niveau des racines si vous avez de la place&13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
N’oubliez pas que tous les fruits cultivés en conteneurs dépendent totalement de vous pour leur nourriture et leur eau, alors désormais, surveillez aussi leur arrosage. En cas de manque d’eau, la plupart des fruits tombent immédiatement s’ils ne se flétrissent pas du tout. N’arrosez pas trop non plus, sinon les racines risquent de pourrir si le compost ne s’écoule pas librement. Restez au-dessus des mauvaises herbes, mais faites attention en binant les framboisiers, mieux vaut désherber à la main, car de nouvelles pousses peuvent apparaître au niveau du sol. Taillez certaines des tiges les plus anciennes des variétés à fruits d’automne (voir mars).&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Fruits de tunnel – raisins, fraises primeurs et figues

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
À l’intérieur du tunnel, les raisins vont maintenant produire de belles pousses juteuses sur les éperons, avec les grappes de fleurs bien visibles. À la fin du mois ou avant, vous devez pincer les extrémités de toutes les pousses sur les éperons (pousses latérales) après qu’elles aient produit deux feuilles au-delà de la grappe de fleurs en développement. C’est tout, sauf les deux pousses tout au bout, sur les raisins cultivés sur un système de tiges permanentes (stem). Celles-ci attirent la sève le long du système de branches et assurent une croissance d’extension si nécessaire. Laissez toujours deux pousses au cas où l’une d’entre elles serait endommagée ou cassée. Dans le cas des raisins taillés au guyot, laissez également deux pousses se développer à la base du rameau fructifère actuel pour qu’elles se développent pleinement. L’hiver prochain, vous couperez complètement le rameau fructifère de cette année, en laissant les tiges qui se sont développées à partir de ces deux pousses à la base qui a poussé ce printemps. Je pense que le système de tiges permanentes fonctionne mieux pour les jardiniers amateurs – c’est plus facile et moins de travail ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Side shoot off main rod of seedless grape 'Rose Dream' - showing end of shoot pinched out 2 leaf joints beyond prospective bunchPousse latérale ou « éperon » de la tige principale du raisin sans pépins « Rose Dream » – montrant l’extrémité de la pousse pincée par deux joints de feuilles au-delà de deux grappes potentielles ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Les raisins se prêtent très bien à la formation et sont également faciles à cultiver dans des pots de la taille d’un seau, cultivés comme un petit buisson – ce qui permet à plusieurs branches de se développer plutôt qu’une seule branche principale. Ils prennent très peu de place de cette façon et la plupart des gens pourraient les cultiver. Vous pouvez obtenir une quantité surprenante de variétés différentes dans un espace assez restreint de cette façon et avoir une bonne répartition du temps de culture de juillet à novembre ou même plus tard. J’expérimente beaucoup avec différentes variétés de raisins et différentes méthodes de taille et de palissage. Les raisins sans pépins n’ont pas besoin d’être éclaircis, alors que si vous n’en éclaircissez pas certains, les grappes peuvent devenir trop nombreuses et sujettes aux maladies.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Je ne fais plus de jus de raisin parce qu’il ne reste plus que beaucoup d’eau sucrée dans la plupart des cas, sans toutes les précieuses fibres naturelles et les nutriments du fruit entier. Si je veux un smoothie, je le passe maintenant au robot ménager ou au puissant mixeur Nutribullet, afin d’obtenir toute la peau, les pépins et les fibres importantes du fruit. Les pépins et la peau du raisin en particulier sont très riches en un produit phytochimique appelé resvératrol – dont les études montrent qu’il est extrêmement bon pour la santé des vaisseaux sanguins et la circulation. Cette teneur est particulièrement élevée dans les raisins noirs ou rouge foncé. Mon raisin noir préféré est le Muscat Hamburgh, qui a le même goût fabuleux que ces énormes raisins Moscatel qui ne sont disponibles qu’avant Noël. Un autre très bon raisin noir est le Muscat Bleu, qui a le même goût délicieux que le Muscat Hambourg mais qui a aussi l’avantage d’avoir des grappes auto-espacées – les raisins individuels étant légèrement plus espacés, ce qui favorise une bonne circulation de l’air – il est donc idéal pour la culture dans les polytunnels où l’atmosphère est plus humide. Une nouvelle variété sans pépins que j’ai plantée il y a quelques années est le « Rose Dream ». Elle donne d’excellents fruits, est très précoce dans le tunnel et très sucrée. Le « Lakemont Seedless » est un raisin de dessert vert précoce délicieusement sucré qui porte de grosses grappes et qui est une très bonne variété pour les jardiniers biologiques car il est très résistant aux maladies. Il est disponible auprès de nombreux fournisseurs. C’est celui que j’utilise pour faire de délicieux raisins secs dans mon déshydrateur ! Il constitue un bel élément décoratif qui enjambe la porte à l’extrémité sud de mon grand tunnel dans un espace qui serait normalement gaspillé. Les cultiver dans un tunnel signifie aussi qu’il est beaucoup plus facile de garder les oiseaux loin d’eux !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Perpetual Strawberry 'Albion' in tunnel La fraise perpétuelle « Albion » dans le tunnel&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Toutes les variétés de fraises perpétuelles dans le tunnel commencent à bien fleurir maintenant. Elles produisent rarement des stolons après leur première année, alors si vous voulez augmenter votre stock, laissez quelques stolons se développer. Bien entendu, les catalogues ou les étiquettes ne vous le disent pas, ils vous disent de les couper toutes. Eh bien, ils veulent en vendre plus, n’est-ce pas ? Tant que les plantes sont fortes et bien nourries – cela ne les affectera pas du tout – et après tout c’est comme ça qu’elles poussent naturellement. De nombreuses variétés modernes à fruits d’été semblent se comporter de la même manière. « Christine » est une variété précoce et très savoureuse que je cultive, et qui fait la même chose, donc il est plus sûr de prendre un bon coureur de chaque plante la première année, de cette façon vous êtes sûr de les garder. Il est donc plus sûr de prendre un bon coureur de chaque plante la première année, de manière à être sûr de les garder. Coupez celles qui se développent après, pour éviter d’affaiblir la plante. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Protégez les fleurs des variétés à fructification précoce du gel avec une toison la nuit – enlevez la toison pendant la journée pour que les abeilles puissent polliniser. Une fois que les fruits sont en train de se développer, donnez chaque semaine un aliment liquide avec une forte teneur en potasse biologique, comme le liquide pour consoude, ou l’excellent aliment biologique pour tomates « Osmo » (disponible chez White’s Agri à Lusk, Co. Dublin et dans de nombreuses jardineries). Si vous ne faites que planter une nouvelle plate-bande de plusieurs variétés, veillez à ne cultiver qu’une seule variété par plate-bande, afin qu’elles soient bien séparées. J’en trouve une précoce comme « Christine », cultivée à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur, avec une ou deux autres variétés perpétuelles, comme « Everest » et « Albion », qui poussent à nouveau à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur, et une variété alpine qui fournit de nombreuses fraises délicieuses à manger fraîches et à congeler, de mai à novembre. Cette année, j’ai également apporté des pots de Gariguette dans le tunnel. Je la cultive depuis des années mais je n’ai jamais essayé de la forcer auparavant. C’est la version française de la fameuse « Souveraine royale » – j’attends donc avec impatience la saveur suprême. Pourquoi diable quelqu’un voudrait-il acheter des produits chimiques insipides et dégoûtants cultivés hors saison, importés de l’autre bout du monde – alors qu’il est si agréable de les attendre à la bonne saison – juste un peu aidé dans un tunnel polyvalent ? D’ailleurs, l' »Albion » se congèle particulièrement bien – pas aussi bien que d’autres variétés &#13 ;
Cape Gooseberry - small plants ready to pot on to larger pots&#13 ;

Groseille du Cap – petites plantes prêtes à être empotées dans des pots plus grands

&#13 ;

Les Physalis (baie d’or, baie de Pichu ou groseille du Cap – peu importe comment vous l’appelez !) devront être mis en pot cette semaine dans des pots plus grands car ils ont bien poussé. Elles porteront leurs fruits à la fin août ou en septembre et se poursuivront jusqu’en décembre. Ensuite, les fruits se conserveront pendant des mois dans le tiroir à salade du réfrigérateur. Ils valent donc la peine d’être cultivés à partir de graines et sont très faciles à cultiver. Ils ont un délicieux goût d’agrumes et d’herbes (même le fait d’écrire à leur sujet me donne l’eau à la bouche !) et sont très riches en antioxydants, en lutéine et en vitamine C. Ils sont encore plus faciles à cultiver que les tomates de brousse, se plaisent très bien dans les bacs ou les grands pots, ne semblent pas du tout déranger les insectes nuisibles, les abeilles aiment vraiment les fleurs et les oiseaux ne les ont pas encore remarquées ! Qu’est-ce qu’il y a à ne pas aimer ? J’ai vu la version naine en vente dans les jardineries – mais elles produisent si peu de fruits qu’elles sont un véritable gaspillage d’espace – et je ne connais personne qui ait réussi avec elles. Certaines des plantes de l’année dernière ont bien hiverné dans le tunnel grâce à la douceur de l’hiver, je leur ai donné à manger il y a environ un mois et elles produisent maintenant beaucoup de belles nouvelles pousses en bas, et même une floraison déjà sur les quelques longues branches qui ne sont pas mortes. J’espère donc qu’elles donneront des fruits très précoces et très bienvenus.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les nuits glaciales peuvent être particulièrement difficiles pour tout fruit tendre poussant dans les tunnels. Les jours très ensoleillés qui suivent une nuit de gel clair, les températures peuvent augmenter à une vitesse alarmante – je dois donc surveiller très attentivement la ventilation – en essayant d’égaliser autant que possible les températures jour/nuit – ce qui n’est pas toujours facile ! Il y a une bonne récolte de figues primeurs qui se développe rapidement sur tous les arbres – beaucoup de figues ont hiverné sans aucun dommage. Celles qui sont endommagées de quelque façon que ce soit ne se développeront pas et finiront par brunir et tomber. C’est une bonne idée de les enlever maintenant pour éviter qu’elles ne pourrissent et ne propagent des maladies aux jeunes figues en bonne santé. Sur la photo, vous pouvez voir les figues de primeur sur la pousse de couleur plus foncée de l’année dernière – la récolte de la fin de l’été se développera sur la nouvelle pousse faite au printemps et en été. Je fais très attention à ce qu’elles restent également bien humides maintenant – si elles se dessèchent et se flétrissent ne serait-ce qu’un peu, les figues vont se débarrasser de tous leurs fruits sans faute – en général environ deux semaines plus tard – alors que vous avez complètement oublié que vous les avez peut-être négligées une seule fois ! Il en va de même pour tous les fruits en pot. Les figues aiment aussi un bon drainage et détestent être trop mouillées. Ce sont donc des diables de tempérament en pot, mais cela en vaut la peine, alors que même les figues fraîches non biologiques coûtent environ un euro chacune dans les magasins de fruits et légumes intelligents ! Je devrais avoir mes premières figues mûres à la mi-juin et j’aurai ensuite une deuxième récolte d’automne, plus importante, sur la nouvelle pousse verte de cette année, sur la plupart des variétés que je cultive.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
L’odeur des fleurs d’agrumes semble remplir le tunnel maintenant, même s’il n’y a que quelques arbres en fleur ! Un vrai parfum d’été qui approche. Je déteste toujours cueillir les derniers citrons et citrons verts, car ils sont si beaux. C’est vraiment idiot, non ? Mais si je les laisse en place, ils empêchent les nouveaux fruits de se développer, même si les fleurs sont pollinisées. Ils sont également protégés la nuit, car les jeunes pousses rouge foncé sont très tendres et vulnérables au gel. Ils reçoivent maintenant un aliment liquide « Osmo » de faible puissance mélangé à de l’eau de pluie à température de tunnel à chaque arrosage – ils détestent l’eau du robinet au pH élevé et au calcaire ! J’aimerais bien que les jardineries ne les arrosent pas avec un tuyau d’arrosage ! S’ils restent trop longtemps dans les jardineries, les feuilles commencent à jaunir et à tomber, car le personnel ne sait pas qu’il préfère la « pluie douce » qui « tombe du ciel » ! À ce propos, il y a quelques années, j’ai vraiment bien ri lors d’une de mes redoutables excursions semestrielles à Dublin ! Je me demande ce que Shakespeare aurait pu dire en étant cité sur un sac de transport de nourriture M&S ? – « Si la musique est la nourriture de l’amour » ! écrit en gros sur un sac recyclable violet vif – Peu importe la suite ! ?&#13 ;
Twelfth Night – Acte 1, scène 1.- Duke Orsino:&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Si la musique est la nourriture de l’amour, jouez-la, donnez-m’en l’excès, cette surabondance, l’appétit peut se faire sentir, et mourir ainsi ;
La musique et la nourriture figureraient certainement en tête de ma liste de priorités ; c’est sûr, j’aime vraiment toutes sortes de fruits. Je me demande si Shakespeare aimait les figues… « Duke Orsino » les aurait certainement appréciées en tant qu’homme méditerranéen. Je ne pense pas qu’on puisse mourir en les mangeant, mais en manger trop peut être un peu désagréable ! J’en trouve une demi-douzaine juste assez par jour, plus c’est trop – mais elles sont si délicieuses qu’il est très difficile d’y résister. De toute façon, je ne pourrais jamais perdre l’amour des figues – c’est l’un de mes fruits préférés. Le problème, c’est que – comme presque tout – chacune à sa propre saison ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Parfois, il semble presque que plus les choses sont difficiles à cultiver, plus elles ont bon goût. Mais alors n’est-ce pas là la vraie joie du jardinage – que l’on puisse aussi goûter un peu à la réussite ! De plus, nous avons toujours quelque chose de nouveau à attendre avec impatience !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Early figs forming from the overwintered buds on last year's darker growth - 13.4.12&#13 ;

Des figues précoces se forment à partir des bourgeons hivernants sur la croissance « ligneuse » plus sombre de l’année dernière. Les nouvelles pousses donneront une récolte plus tardive à la plupart des variétés de figues dans les tunnels.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Strong red-flushed young growth, overwintered fruit  and flowers on lemons in tunnel  -13.4.12&#13 ;

Jeunes pousses à forte poussée rouge, fruits et fleurs hivernants sur des citrons dans le tunnel




 (Please note. I really enjoy sharing my original ideas and 40 years experience of growing and cooking my own organic food with you. It’s most satisfying and naturally also very complimentary if others find « inspiration » in my work……But if you do happen to copy any of my material, or repeat it in any way online – I would appreciate it very much if you would please mention that it originally came from me. It’s the result of many years of hard work and hard won-experience. Thank you.)
Cet article a été rédigé par et traduit par serre2jardin.com. Les produits sont sélectionnés de manière indépendante. Serre2jardin.com perçoit une rémunération lorsqu’un de nos lecteurs procède à l’achat en ligne d’un produit mis en avant.