Menu Fermer

Le Potager du Polytunnel en juin

June contents: What do Scientists really Know about Life, the Universe and Everything?….  A More Unusual Polytunnel Crop….. Hurrah – Tomatoes are ripe! Now we have ‘Tomato Heaven’ for the rest of the summer!…  Dealing with aphids….  Heat Damage on Tomatoes….  Tomato feeding…. To side-shoot or not to side-shoot – that is the question?….  Keep encouraging tunnel wildlife to help you with pest control. 

 These Rosada plants leaning towards each other trying to avoid the intense heat in the last couple of weeks reminded me horribly of some of the pictures taken during the Australian bushfires
These Rosada plants leaning towards each other trying to avoid the intense heat in the last couple of weeks reminded me horribly of some of the pictures taken during the Australian bushfires



What do Scientists really Know about Life, the Universe and Everything?


« It is a wise man who knows what he doesn’t know » –  is an ancient saying that often comes to mind when confronted by the often mind-boggling stupidity of some scientists – especially some on social media!  I believe their often narrow and blindfolded view is actually a hindrance to the furtherance of our knowledge of the natural world.  Science is beginning to discover so many amazing things about plants which we were not aware of before. Far from demystifying them – for me it makes them even more fascinating. It’s now proving that plants can react to outside influences far more than we previously thought and that they can even communicate with each other – both above and below ground. They can talk to each other too – in a molecular language – by giving off chemical signals to warn each other of threats when another nearby plant is attacked by pests, or damaged in some way. Science is even showing how plants may be aware of our presence too – but because we humans are conditioned to expect all other species to react to outside stimuli exactly as we do – we are incapable of recognising that they react – but in different ways to us.


There is still so much more that we don’t know about plants and how they live their lives, interacting with everything else in their environment. To see the dark, early morning picture of the Rosada tomato plants above – desperately seeking comfort and shade by leaning towards each other and almost hugging last week, reminded me horribly of so many of the pictures of the many terrified animal species which we saw during the Australian bush fires that seem ages ago now – but which in reality were so very recent.  Those images still haunt me.  (Later on I talk about heat damage in tomatoes and how to deal with it.)  But those Rosada plants were a reminder to me that we must never take a purely mechanistic view of Nature, especially plants, if we want to understand them better.  We need to listen to them more and learn their language – only then will we truly understand these miracles of Nature, that we totally depend upon for our healthy existence, within the interconnected web of life on this fragile planet.  There is still so much left to discover – so many mysteries to be unravelled – and how exciting it all is!


Many scientists tend to reduce Nature and the food we eat to purely the sum of it’s currently-known chemical constituents – but it is so much more than just that. They give all the various components of food names and values, placing them into the context within which they believe they belong, given their still limited knowledge. Many of us trust that they are all-knowing……but they aren’t…. and never can be.  Every new scientific discovery shows us very clearly that scientists don’t know it all. They’re often only guessing at how all the many and complex natural components of foods – some of which they still don’t even know exist – interact within our bodies. That is, until the next ‘eureka moment’ that reveals a little more of how Nature works. Even something as seemingly simple as water has properties that react in our bodies in ways that are still, as yet, little understood. 


One of my most constantly inspirational heroes – the curious, incredibly brave and brilliant Nobel physicist Richard Feynman put it this way – « There is a difference between knowing the name of something and truly understanding it ».  How very true! The more we know – the more that the wiser among us realise that there is a huge amount that we still don’t know! Those who try to convince us that GMOs are totally safe are purely motivated by short-term commercial greed and by owning the patent on their particular method of genetic engineering. They cannot in all honesty assure us that they are safe – when they still don’t even understand fully how organisms such as bacteria or viruses, for instance, can interact with each other within their natural environment! They didn’t predict the development of Glyphosate-resistance in weeds did they, for instance?  


Nature has a way of behaving in unpredictable ways and making fools of arrogant scientists! Remember that they are performing their experiments in laboratories. If you take bacteria or other organisms out of their natural environment, then cultivate them in an agar or some other nutrient solution in a Petri dish and then study them under a microscope – they are most definitely NOT in their natural environment!  As my scientist son says – Heisenberg’s Principle – « that the very nature of laboratory experiments fundamentally changes the way things behave » – particularly applies to natural organisms. This is one of the first things that all student scientists should learn. They are often limited by the ignorance of their tutors though. A bit more humility in many scientists wouldn’t go astray – rather than arrogance and plain naked greed! 


Nature has given us an innate early warning system which we have termed ‘gut feeling’ and this is often far more reliable than the prevailing scientific opinion of the day – if we are prepared to listen to it.  That ‘gut feeling is now an established fact! That’s why I grow organically – because I’ve known in my gut for over 40 years now that it is the only way to grow the truly healthy real food which our bodies need. It’s perfectly simple! Any scientist worth their salt should have the common sense to know that the way that nature evolved us to eat has to be the only healthy way for us to eat. It is a pity so few have the honesty to admit it!!  Every time one Googles anything about GMOs, pesticides or food these days, one is assaulted by a plethora of different articles by seemingly independent journalists – but which in reality are paid for by the vested interests of the multinational chemical companies or huge food corporations. These first websites that come up in searches are all trying to convince us that those of us who question if their products are safe are a lot of ignorant ‘alternative’ green idiots who know nothing  – and that their ‘true’ science is all-knowing! They try to convince us that what they are doing is genuinely trying to feed the world – when actually they’re only interested in profit – at any cost whatever to the planet! 


I had an incidence of this yesterday on Twitter – when an arrogant Professor of ‘Bioinformatics’ actually labelled me an ‘Organic Crank » for saying that the best way to boost our immunity is to eat a healthy diet – something which is now a widely established scientific fact!  (For those who are wondering – « Bioinformatics is the collection, classification, storage and analysis of biochemical and biological information using computers – especially as applied to molecular genetics and genomics » according to Wikipedia!)…  Of course – we all know that computers are only as good as those programming them!  They are a man-made phenomenon which can’t understand or decode Nature!….   And neither seemingly can many university professors – who seem totally isolated and disconnected from the Nature which we actually evolved to live in and on, and need to survive!  They seem totally oblivious to the fact that the genetically engineered organisms they create may have unintended effects on the natural world, which doesn’t always react predictably, and that almost none of the GMO crops they produce by inserting viruses and bacteria into their DNA have ever been tested in human trials to discover any unintended effects!


The only way to sustainably and safely feed a growing population is to restore the vital soil health which agricultural chemicals have been systematically destroying for the last many decades, since the advent of agricultural chemicals! Chemicals don’t feed the vital soil life which we depend on not just to produce healthy food but also to mitigate the currently disastrously accelerating climate change. 


I’d better stop now – but I could go on ranting about this forever! You can blame the current incumbent of the White House whose toxic name I can’t even bring myself to utter! After selfishly dumping the Paris Accord on climate change, just to be popular with his American voters, I spent many sleepless nights worrying about the future! Don’t those voters who put him in The White House realise that what he is doing is destroying not just their children’s future – but also that of everything else on this beautiful planet we call home? Are they really so brainwashed by all that stuff on Google – denying climate change and telling us that chemicals and GMOs are perfectly harmless – that they have lost all ability to reason, think for themselves and even use basic common sense? Or are they simply as selfish as he is and just don’t want to face reality? He won’t care – he’s an old man and he’ll be dead soon!  He’s just getting a final high right now on his enjoyment of all-powerful, ultimate control and doesn’t give a toss about the future after he’s gone! Even merely the fact that he is someone who would condone his children killing endangered  African wildlife surely tells you all you need to know – doesn’t it?


I know that like me you want hope – not gloom! And do you know what? There IS something every single one of us can do. We CAN fight for Nature in our own plots – whether those plots are just a window box or an acre! I started off here 35 years ago in a silent, barren field with no birds or bees anywhere. Now, despite being an island in the middle of otherwise intensively farmed land, I have a beautiful Nature- filled space that echoes with birdsong all day long – and that includes the polytunnel as you can see from the picture at the top which I took yesterday. Those growers with row upon row of sterile-looking crops (even some organic ones) who don’t do everything they can to encourage Nature, are actually missing the point! They’re only focusing selfishly on what they are getting out of it for themselves! Some never even mention Nature – but we CAN all make a difference to the future and to vital biodiversity……. and we CAN DO IT together! 


 Roses surrounding rose petal syrup with kefir ice cream&#13 ;
Des roses entourant du sirop de pétales de rose avec de la glace au kéfir&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Une récolte plus inhabituelle de Polytunnel&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La plupart des gens pensent que les tunnels sont uniquement destinés à la culture des fruits et légumes, mais je fais pousser quelques cultures un peu plus inhabituelles dans le mien ! Peu de gens pensent que les roses sont une culture – mais elles sont en fait une culture commerciale extrêmement importante dans les pays du Moyen-Orient où elles sont beaucoup utilisées en cuisine. Là-bas, elles sont utilisées dans toutes sortes de plats sucrés et salés. Dans la cuisine anglaise, elles sont également utilisées depuis des millénaires, et dans les médicaments aussi. J’aime le parfum des roses anciennes et hybrides perpétuelles depuis l’enfance, où j’ai grandi dans un jardin qui en était rempli. Leur parfum me ramène instantanément à cette époque. Les étés, à l’époque, dans les shires anglais étaient invariablement chauds et secs, ce qui leur convenait parfaitement. Les roses aiment le temps chaud et sec qu’elles obtiennent en abondance dans des pays comme la Turquie – mais malheureusement, nous n’avons pas de climat moyen-oriental ici en Irlande. Le changement climatique modifie également les schémas météorologiques, et au moins un été sur trois semble désormais être principalement humide. La pluie ruine les fleurs de toutes les roses, rendant les pétales bruns et boueux, et transformant les fleurs de beaucoup des plus belles en boules brunes pourries. C’est pourquoi j’en fais pousser dans le tunnel, où elles ne sont jamais abîmées par la pluie !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Bien sûr, l’une des principales raisons de cultiver vos propres roses biologiques pour la cuisine, que ce soit à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur du jardin, est qu’elles sont totalement sûres pour la consommation, alors que celles achetées chez les fleuristes auront été pulvérisées avec de nombreux pesticides toxiques non approuvés pour la consommation humaine, même si vous n’aviez pas d’objection à les manger à ce moment-là ! Et une étude récente sur les enfants dans les zones de culture des fleurs a montré que la santé des enfants est gravement endommagée par ces pesticides – donc, cultiver les vôtres n’est pas seulement meilleur pour votre santé, mais aussi pour celle des autres !https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190522162713.htm&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les roses les plus historiques qui ont été traditionnellement cultivées au Moyen-Orient depuis des milliers d’années sont la rosa Damascena, r. Centifolia et r. Gallica – mais elles ne fleurissent qu’une fois en juin et juillet. Ma préférée est probablement la vieille rose mousse Henri Martin – que j’appelle ma rose Turkish Delight – pour des raisons évidentes ! Parce que ces variétés ne fleurissent qu’une seule fois – depuis de nombreuses années, j’expérimente certaines des variétés les plus parfumées, les plus modernes et à floraison répétée. Cultivées dans de grands bacs de compost sans tourbe mélangé à de la terre – pour donner un peu plus de corps au compost – les roses produisent très bien si elles sont régulièrement nourries avec une bonne alimentation à base de tomates biologiques à haute teneur en cendres… Même les roses tendres les plus difficiles et les plus difficiles à cultiver, comme l’hybride de thé Guinee, au parfum exquis et presque noir, ou les roses plus anciennes et incroyablement parfumées Emporeur du Maroc et Souvenir du Dr Jamain, aiment la vie en tunnel. Elles fleurissent bien et leurs fleurs ne sont jamais gâchées par la pluie. J’ai essayé pendant des années de faire pousser la Guinee à l’extérieur, mais cela a été très difficile et j’ai presque abandonné. Mais il y a quelques années, je l’ai déterrée, plantée dans un grand bac et je lui ai dit sans ambages que c’était vraiment sa dernière chance – et depuis, elle n’a pas regardé en arrière ! Certains des nouveaux types de roses « anglaises » à floraison répétée, créés par feu David Austin, sont également excellents. Parmi les plus sombres de celles qui ont un bon parfum, on trouve Falstaff, Munstead Wood, Othello et Shakespeare, et Young Lycidas est une rose profonde très bien parfumée. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
J’ai tendance à préférer les variétés de couleur marron ou cramoisi foncé, car elles semblent donner le meilleur goût au sirop avec une couleur sombre très riche, mais il m’arrive aussi d’inclure des variétés plus claires, si elles ont un très bon parfum. Si vous faites de l’eau de rose à partir de toutes les roses roses, elle a tendance à être de couleur brunâtre. Le sirop d’eau de rose est délicieux lorsqu’il est versé sur des meringues ou de la glace au kéfir, et fait passer les framboises qui y sont marinées dans une autre dimension ! O cueillez les fleurs tôt le matin ou en milieu de matinée, après que l’humidité ait disparu des pétales, mais avant que le parfum ne commence à s’évaporer dans la chaleur du polytunnel. Elles peuvent être conservées pendant 2 à 3 jours dans une boîte au réfrigérateur si vous n’en avez pas assez à ce moment-là pour une recette. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Lorsque vous préparez un sirop de rose, la seule chose dont vous devez vous souvenir est de couper la base blanche des pétales de rose, car elle a un goût amer. La façon la plus simple et la plus rapide de procéder consiste à rassembler toute la fleur dans la main gauche, à retirer la tige et les sépales, puis à couper toute la base de la rose avec des ciseaux tranchants. Retirez les morceaux d’étamines que vous voyez après que les pétales soient tombés dans le bol, car ils peuvent également être amers. Cela peut sembler compliqué, mais croyez-moi, une fois que vous avez goûté le résultat, cela en vaut la peine ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
On dit que le parfum est le premier sens que nous développons, et le dernier que nous perdons. Si c’est le cas, la dernière odeur que je voudrais ressentir serait celle des roses. Elles me rappellent tant de souvenirs. La rose hybride perpétuelle Ophelia a été la première fleur dont je me souviens avoir remarqué l’odeur, dans le joli jardin où j’ai grandi. Je la cultive ici pour me rappeler ce beau jardin aujourd’hui disparu depuis longtemps – mais toujours présent dans ma mémoire. Et mon père m’appelait toujours Rosebud quand j’étais jeune. C’est ce qui est merveilleux dans les jardins – on n’est jamais vraiment seul tant qu’on a encore de tels souvenirs…&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
On n’est jamais vraiment seul dans un jardin…&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
En été, mon moment préféré de la journée dans le jardin est la fin de la soirée, quand, au crépuscule, tous les sens semblent amplifiés – en particulier les odeurs. Dans la lumière crépusculaire qui diminue lentement, il y a un silence magique où l’on peut entendre une feuille tomber. En restant immobile, vous pouvez presque sentir et entendre tout ce qui pousse. Il y a une atmosphère tangible. On ressent une sorte de « vibe » ou d’énergie – un sentiment certain que l’on n’est pas tout à fait seul et que le jardin a une âme qui lui est propre – ou « Genius Loci ». Ce sentiment est perceptible même dans les tunnels, où les plantes poussent de manière urgente. Je ne suis pas la seule personne à ressentir cela – c’est le cas de nombreux jardiniers sensibles – et je pense que pour être un bon jardinier, il faut être une personne sensible. Je me souviens du merveilleux vieux Harry Dodson qui disait la même chose dans cette charmante série télévisée, le Victorian Kitchen Garden, il y a de nombreuses années. À l’époque, il avait dit que certains pourraient le trouver fantaisiste – mais pas moi – ce sentiment est bien présent. Il a dit qu’il le ressentait plus particulièrement lorsqu’il fermait ses serres la nuit – et je sais ce qu’il voulait dire – je le ressens aussi. C’est une sensation étrange qu’il est impossible de mettre en mots. Je pense que les poètes étaient souvent meilleurs pour exprimer ce « quelque chose » intangible mais très précis. Le soir, je suis certainement en paix dans mes tunnels, entouré de toutes les plantes qui poussent tranquillement et en compagnie de toutes les abeilles et de tous les oiseaux, tout comme la nature nous a voulus. On peut oublier un moment les nombreux soucis de ce monde lorsqu’il est entouré d’une biodiversité si merveilleusement abondante. Mais je n’oublie jamais que je ne suis qu’une infime partie de ce tableau d’une beauté complexe – et que j’existe uniquement grâce au reste de la nature……. C’est une pensée très humiliante.. ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Hourrah – Les tomates sont mûres ! Nous avons maintenant le « Paradis de la tomate » – pour le reste de l’été !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
First Maskotka ripe 3rd June. Sown 11th FebMaskotka mûr au début du mois de juin&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La Maskotka est une tomate fiable dont je ne voudrais jamais me passer, et c’est depuis de nombreuses années la tomate la plus précoce que j’aie jamais cultivée – toujours mûre pendant la première semaine de juin si elle est semée début mars – et j’en ai essayé beaucoup ! Mais cette année, il y a de la concurrence – Tumbler ! La Maskotka est une variété de buisson assez grande, qui a tendance à s’étaler un peu pendant l’été et à prendre beaucoup de place au sol. Le Tumbler est cependant beaucoup plus petit et plus compact, et convient beaucoup mieux à la culture dans des paniers suspendus et dans mon jardin à escabeau. Cette année, la variété de buisson plus petite Tumbler a connu un grand succès sur les marches de mon jardin escamotable. La première tomate a été mûre le 26 mai ! Mais je n’ai semé Maskotka qu’un peu plus tard, alors la comparaison est un peu injuste ! L’année prochaine, je les sèmerai toutes les deux en même temps et je comparerai les deux pour la saveur et la précocité. C’est l’une des choses que j’aime dans le jardinage – la possibilité de toujours expérimenter et comparer les cultures vivrières ou d’autres plantes, pour découvrir quelles sont les meilleures variétés à cultiver dans un endroit particulier &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Je cultive également beaucoup d’autres plantes de la famille des Solanacées (tomates, aubergines, etc.). Je n’ai donc pas assez de place pour toutes les cultiver en pleine terre si je veux respecter un plan de rotation adéquat, ce qui réduit les risques de maladies ou de problèmes de carence en nutriments. C’est pourquoi, cette année encore, je fais pousser la « Maskotka » et certaines de mes autres variétés de tomates préférées dans de grands pots, ce qui m’a valu beaucoup de succès par le passé. Comme cette année nous ne sommes pas sûrs qu’il y aura un festival de la tomate totalement génial au jardin botanique national de Glasnevin, à Dublin, en raison de la pandémie actuelle, je m’en tiens aux variétés éprouvées, les plus savoureuses et les plus fiables que j’ai cultivées pendant de nombreuses années, je ne semble jamais avoir de problèmes avec la nouaison des fruits, même en les commençant très tôt, car les tomates sont généralement autofertiles de toute façon, et encore une fois parce que je fais aussi pousser des mingardens au bout des tunnels de chaque côté des portes, pleins de fleurs et d’herbes qui font entrer les abeilles et autres insectes bénéfiques, s’ils ont besoin de pollinisation les insectes sont tous plus qu’heureux de fournir leurs services !.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Tomato Heaven! Insalata Caprese - with (from bottom) John Baer, Green Cherokee, Ananas Noir & luscious buffalo mozzarella.Le paradis de la tomate ! Insalata Caprese – avec (à partir du bas) John Baer, Green Cherokee, Ananas Noir &amp ; mozzarella de buffle succulente.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La lutte contre les pucerons dans les tunnels ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La première chose que beaucoup de gens font quand ils voient des pucerons est de paniquer et d’atteindre un spray de quelque chose – même ceux qui se considèrent comme organiques ! C’est souvent la pire chose que l’on puisse faire ! La première chose à comprendre à propos des pucerons est que le fait de se nourrir avec des engrais artificiels ou de suralimenter avec du fumier azoté favorise exactement le type de croissance douce dont tous les pucerons se régalent. Cela réduit également la capacité de la plante à se défendre elle-même en déprimant les bactéries et les champignons du sol. La suralimentation – même avec du fumier organique – peut avoir le même effet en raison de la forte teneur en azote. Vous pouvez obtenir des plantes d’apparence très impressionnante en vous attachant à des tonnes de fumier ou de compost comme le conseillent certains « experts », mais vous n’aurez pas de plantes saines. Mais vous n’aurez pas de plantes saines. Elles auront une croissance molle et sape qui sera beaucoup plus attrayante pour les parasites et les maladies. Je vois si souvent ces « experts » se faire demander plus tard dans l’été comment lutter contre les pucerons ! Cela prouve en quelque sorte mon point de vue – je n’en vois jamais ici du tout !! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Tomatoes in recycled 10lt buckets&#13 ;

Tomates dans des seaux recyclés de 10 l sur des plateaux de culture dans le tunnel ouest-fruits – les fleurs en pot entre les plantes attirent les insectes utiles

&#13 ;

La présence de pucerons sur une plante est un signe certain que la plante est stressée d’une manière ou d’une autre – souvent avec une réponse immunitaire réduite en raison d’une suralimentation avec des engrais à forte teneur en azote ou peut-être du fumier. Certaines personnes ont des problèmes de pucerons en ce moment car de nombreuses plantes ont été stressées par les conditions climatiques extrêmes de ce printemps. Une attaque de parasites est presque toujours un signe certain de ce stress ou d’un autre type de stress, comme par exemple de mauvaises conditions sur le rebord d’une fenêtre de maison, une chaleur trop élevée ou une trop grande affluence. Gardez donc un œil sur vos plantes. Examinez-les attentivement tous les jours, en particulier les jeunes plantes encore dans les propagateurs. Les journées très chaudes de la semaine dernière ont parfois encouragé les pucerons et autres parasites à se multiplier rapidement, ce qui pourrait poser un problème, à moins qu’il n’y ait beaucoup de prédateurs dans les environs. Comme je fais pousser tant de fleurs dans mes tunnels pour attirer les insectes utiles – qui à leur tour attirent toutes sortes d’oiseaux insectivores et autres animaux sauvages – j’ai une armée permanente de contrôleurs de parasites tels que moineaux, rouges-gorges, troglodytes et grenouilles, qui chassent dans les tunnels tout au long de l’année. C’est fascinant de les voir chercher assidûment dans chaque crevasse des plantes à la recherche d’insectes pour nourrir leurs bébés affamés. Et il y en a certainement beaucoup, à en juger par les cris exigeants et bruyants de tous les coins du jardin !






If you don’t have a feathered army of pest controllers and you have an infestation building up on soft young shoots – please don’t panic and spray with anything!  If there seems to be quite a lot then try just brushing them off gently first with a soft household paint brush or a pastry brush – particularly on plants like tomatoes where you don’t want to wet the foliage – as that might encourage disease. Gently brushing with a small soft paintbrush often works well and buys you a bit more time while predators like hoverflies, ladybirds and wasps build up enough to deal with aphids. The gentle brushing also stimulates the plants to develop their own insect defences.  Allow small birds like sparrows and wrens into your tunnels – they will help to gobble them up. Just hang large pea and bean netting on the doors & vents to keep pigeons or pheasants out.  Put a peanut feeder near the open door of your greenhouse or tunnel as this will attract birds, and while they’re waiting for their turn on the feeder they’ll be encouraged to look for a few aphids as well. I know it’s often quite hard to be patient and just trust nature – we’ve been so conditioned to believe that everything needs to be sprayed with something – even if it’s only something natural!. I don’t use any sprays of any sort whatsoever and haven’t done for 40 years! 


Nature doesn’t always give you instant results – particularly in difficult weather – but try it and if it doesn’t work you can always order a biological control like aphidius Colemanii – or ladybirds. They’re not cheap though at about 40 euros for even the smallest amount you can buy!  Whereas birds come free – with an additional entertainment factor!  


The other great pest controllers are the members of the beneficial insect army. If you’ve got lots of insect-attracting flowers in your veg. garden and tunnel then they should attract plenty of predatory insects to deal with your pests. Flowering at the moment in the tunnel are borage, calendula (pot marigold), French marigold, feverfew, salad burnet, limnanthes (poached egg flower), phacelia, perennial Bowles wallflower, pansies, nicotiana, nepeta, scabious, sweet rocket and the herbs parsley and coriander which are flowering really well as well as Sweet Rocket and Nicotiana Affinis which smell heavenly at night – attracting lots of moths for the bats. I’ve seen quite a few wasps about this year too – and although they’re aggressive little devils, they are voracious hunters of things like greenfly and caterpillars to feed their growing broods. 


There are plenty of predators more than willing and able to do a good job of pest control for you given the chance – but if you spray with poisonous insecticides or even just an organic insecticidal soap spray – you will break the natural food chain by killing the good insects as well as the bad – including bees. And we all know how vital it is to help bees at the moment as they’re so under threat of extinction from pesticides. Throwing the baby out with the bath water so to speak! I even use the organic soap spray for is for scale insect on my citrus trees if I get a very bad infestation – I discovered some time ago that melted coconut oil brushed onto the scale insects with a soft children’s paintbrush works just as well as organic soap sprays and doesn’t affect anything else. It stops them breathing – then they die and drop off.



Keep an eye out for the start of any diseases now. I try to run my eye over everything in the veg garden each day if I can and I pick off any fading or diseased leaves etc. immediately – before any disease can start or spreads. In the humid conditions of the tunnel this can happen very rapidly. With all the different varieties of tomatoes making a sudden spurt of growth after the hot weather they also need looking over for side shoots every day – so I take a bucket round with me and pick off any dodgy looking leaves at the same time. Sometimes a purplish colour and browning at the tips or bleaching between the ribs of leaves is actually damage caused by a nutrient deficiency – usually magnesium – which can happen if planting is delayed and things are kept waiting in their pots – this happened with some of my tomatoes this year despite extra feeding. These bits can become diseased later in damp conditions – so I always pick them off if they start to brown.



Heat Damage on Tomatoes


Every year some people ask me why all their tomatoes are curling up very tightly at the top – some looking quite ‘ferny’ with some of the leaf tips browning – almost as if they’d been sprayed with weedkiller!  This isn’t caused by a disease – it happens because of stress from very intense heat. Tunnels are generally wonderful but they are a bit more difficult to manage than greenhouses in really hot weather unless you also have side ventilation to reduce the heat build up. It’s impossible to shade large tunnels unless you’re a millionaire and have automatic outside shading. Shading inside is no good as it doesn’t stop the heat and also stops air circulation. Greenhouses are easier as you can paint them with some stuff called ‘Cool Glass’ – it’s a sort of whitewash paint which stops the heat getting through the glass. It goes clear in wet weather so doesn’t stop light. My tunnels have been well over 40 deg C/100 deg F for the last couple of weeks when it’s been really sunny. The best thing to do in that situation is to ‘damp down’ all surfaces like paths really well with water three or four times a day while it’s so hot. The evaporation cools the air and keeps it moving and buoyant. Only the paths though – NEVER THE PLANTS – despite what I’ve seen some so-called ‘experts’ recommending! This just encourages diseases – particularly potato blight – especially in tunnels because they’re so warm and humid – and this can attack tomatoes too. 


The tops of many tomato plants curling up is always most obvious during the hottest part of the day – but if you look at them last thing at night –  you will see some of them almost visibly relaxing and uncurling again – poor things!  It’s their only way to avoid some of the damage. Since they obviously can’t run away, they have had to develop other methods. Although tomatoes like sun and bright light – they can’t stand it if it’s too intense – so they curl up to try to avoid leaf exposure and damage. As long as you keep damping down paths this will minimise damage as far as possible and it will have less effect. If you don’t do this the overheating can cause serious long term damage. Leaves may turn brown and die back altogether, and flowers may drop – affecting potential crops and often killing plants completely. Some don’t uncurl again though because they are irreversibly damaged.


Heat-damaged main tomato shoot on left with healthy undamaged side-shoot on right to be trained up as replacment main shootLa pousse principale de tomate endommagée par la chaleur à gauche et la pousse latérale saine et non endommagée à droite seront utilisées comme pousse principale de remplacement ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Si vous avez des dommages permanents causés par la chaleur sur le sommet de certains plants de tomates, cela se manifestera très rapidement, en quelques jours ou en une semaine à cette époque de l’année. La pousse principale de la tige principale peut être tellement brûlée, déformée et nanifiée qu’elle ne se remettra jamais, même si le reste de la plante est encore complètement sain. Ainsi, même si vous perdez une grappe de tomates à proximité des dégâts causés par la chaleur sur la tige principale, le reste de la plante continuera à pousser normalement plus tard et vous ne perdrez pas trop de temps de culture. C’est pourquoi, si je soupçonne des dégâts dus à la chaleur à cause de températures trop élevées, je laisse toujours une ou deux pousses latérales près du sommet et je ne les pince pas avant d’avoir choisi la plus forte qui peut prendre la relève comme nouvelle pousse « principale ». Sur la plante de la photo, vous pouvez clairement voir que la pousse principale d’origine est devenue tordue et déformée – et j’ai laissé la prochaine pousse latérale d’apparence saine pour s’entraîner. Certaines variétés semblent être plus sensibles que d’autres – toutes ne semblent pas souffrir autant chaque année. Il s’agit d’une délicieuse petite tomate prune/cerise vert olive appelée Green Envy – qui semble être particulièrement sensible aux dommages causés par la chaleur, mais qui est l’une des préférées de mon fils. C’est pourquoi je la cultive – j’ai un top pour garder la tondeuse heureuse !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
N’arrosez pas trop les plants de tomates non plus – cela n’aide pas à limiter les dégâts causés par la chaleur – cela ne fait que pourrir les racines ! Gardez le sol bien humide – en arrosant toujours les alentours – jamais directement à la base des plantes – et recouvrez le sol de tontes d’herbe ou de consoude si vous le pouvez, pour garder les racines fraîches. Comme je le dis toujours – un peu plus de TLC, d’observation et d’attention aux détails et vous serez richement récompensé par vos plantes très reconnaissantes !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Cucumber 'Burpless Tasty Green' with courgette 'Atena' in side bed late MayConcombre « Burpless Tasty Green » avec courgette « Atena » dans le lit d’appoint fin mai ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Tout comme en 2017 &amp ; 2018 – l’année a été si difficile pour les jeunes plants de tomates. La température dans le tunnel varie de 100 degrés F/40 degrés C pendant la journée à des nuits glaciales. Ces dernières nuits, la température n’était que de 2°C, soit au moins 6°C de moins que le minimum requis pour la croissance des tomates. Il y a quelques semaines à peine, il faisait -3°C dans les tunnels ! Même sous trois couches de toison, les tomates étaient littéralement bleues de froid ! Depuis lors, elles sont également stressées par la chaleur ! Je suis étonné qu’elles se soient si bien remises, mais elles poussent à nouveau maintenant et les prévisions météorologiques pour la fin de cette semaine annoncent des nuits plus chaudes. Espérons que ce sera le cas ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Bumble bee pollinating beefsteak tomato, with carrots under fleece behindBourdon pollinisant la tomate beefsteak, avec des carottes sous la toison derrière&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Mes tomates sont toujours étouffées par de petits bourdons dès qu’elles fleurissent – je pense donc qu’attirer les pollinisateurs est aussi l’un des secrets, et aussi bien pailler pour garder les racines juste uniformément humides et pour éviter les variations sauvages de la température des racines qui pourraient autrement stresser les plantes. Il est également utile de faire pousser des fleurs à proximité des portes des tunnels, à l’extérieur de ces derniers, un peu comme une « piste » florale ou un panneau de bienvenue pour encourager les abeilles à se poser à l’intérieur des tunnels ! Toutes les variétés de tomates sont maintenant bien installées et j’ai hâte de vous montrer les nouvelles variétés, qui ont l’air très intéressantes, en particulier les nouvelles variétés noires, qui sont riches en anthocyanes, des substances phytochimiques saines &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Alimentation des tomates




As soon as the first complete truss is set on any variety, I start giving them a weekly liquid feed with either a home made comfrey/nettle/borage stew which provides potassium, nitrogen and magnesium – or a proprietary brand like ‘Osmo’ liquid organic tomato food which I’ve used for the several years now and found really excellent. You’ll find it in most garden centres now and you can also buy it in White’s Agri, Ballough Lusk Co. Dublin if you’re anywhere near North County Dublin. They are the main importers for Osmo products and have the whole range there. In addition they sell the brilliant Klassman certified organic peat-free compost cheaper than most other places. I think that Osmo certified organic tomato feed is available in the UK – but if it’s not available near you – then ask your garden centre to stock it. I find it a really excellent feed for everything both in the ground or in containers. With tomatoes in containers I tend to feed about 3 times a week when they get bigger as they’re more dependent. I would never use a non-organic tomato food.  


I also make a liquid feed if I only have a small amount of tomatoes, but it’s very difficult to make enough for 90 or more plants – if I’m growing for Tomato Festivals! You just can’t make it quickly enough! I’m not very scientific about exact amounts as a recipe for a home made liquid feed. I just stuff a large barrel with comfrey, borage and young fresh nettles. The nettles provide the nitrogen that really kick starts the whole breakdown process going, the borage provides magnesium that it’s particularly good at extracting from the soil, and the comfrey provides potash. It really smells horrendous when it’s really stewing! If you get it on your hands or clothes it’s very hard to wash off! The most important thing is to use the comfrey variety Bocking 14 – as that’s the one that was selected by the late Lawrence Hills of the Henry Doubleday Research Association (now re-named Garden Organic) as being the comfrey that’s highest in potash. Other comfreys, including wild ones are far lower in potash. The one rule I use is to wait until it’s really broken down and looks a bit like soup – and then dilute to about the colour of a weak herb tea. Don’t use it too early as it may either be useless or possibly even burn roots. Wait until it looks like a green really smelly smoothie! I also give them a tonic of worm compost tea occasionally. It’s all about keeping an eye on your crops, getting a feel for what they need, and feeding before they start to look hungry, otherwise it can take them a long time to pick up again. Don’t overfeed them but let them become starved either – it’s all about balance!



To side-shoot or not to side-shoot – that is the question! Especially with beefsteak tomatoes!


When it comes to removing side shoots, you obviously don’t have to remove the side shoots of bush varieties, or you wouldn’t get any fruit!. Most people know that you have to pinch out the little shoots growing in the leaf axils between the leaves and the stem on varieties of cordon or upright tomatoes, but I’ve never seen any of the ‘experts’ warning about how some of the continental beefsteaks behave though – which makes me wonder if they’ve ever actually grown them!! Those types can be a bit of a law unto themselves – or try to be. You have to be firm and impose your will! I never pinch out the one or two shoots near the top of the stems until I can see a very definite main one which will continue the upward growth. From bitter experience I’ve found that many of them would really much prefer to be bushes which is their natural habit in the wild, and they will often make two or even three shoots at the very top which all look like leading shoots (very confusing), in which case you have to choose one which looks to be the strongest and most likely to grow on further and flower. Or maybe sometimes none at all – they’ll just suddenly produce a flower truss instead, going ‘blind’ with no growing point at the top, in which case you have to be patient and just wait for another side shoot to begin to grow in a top leaf axil, or somewhere else, as it will do in a week or so, and then train that one up. 


Beefsteaks really much prefer hotter, sunnier and drier Mediterranean or continental climate summers, like USA summers generally are, where they can be the bushes they obviously long to be, and sprawl about happily about in the sun doing do their own thing! But in our often dull, damp Irish ‘summers’ – if you’re not strict with them – you can end up with a thoroughly unproductive, disease-ridden, slug eaten mess! Particularly with grafted ones which can be far to vigorous judging from the ones I was sent to trial a few years ago. Those were also tasteless which was a bit pointless really! They should produce four decent trusses at least though, if carefully trained. They do tend to be a bit prima-donna-ish, they ripen a lot later than the smaller tomatoes, but their flavour makes it well worth the trouble once you get the hang of them.


Many articles on growing tomatoes are written by experts living in the South East of England where their summers are so much hotter and drier than ours here or in the South West of the UK, so they don’t tend to recommend varieties that are suitable for a damper climate. I’ve tried lots over the years, but in our damp climate with often poor light, I’ve found ‘Pantano Romanesco’ really is always the most reliable. ‘Costuloto Fiorentino’ and Costuloto Genovese also have a great flavour – but are a bit more disease prone in damp summers, as is Super Marmande.  Black Krim and Black Sea Man both have supreme flavour but get every known disease far quicker than anything else in a polytunnel. The newer varieties which are being bred seem to be better behaved and less disease prone – but as they don’t have even half the flavour – what’s the point?!  All tomatoes tend to prefer the much drier atmosphere of a greenhouse. I used to grow them in one every year when we lived nearer to the coast, but then greenhouses have their own unique problems too, those encouraged by a drier atmosphere, and all things being equal polytunnels are far better value for money, as you get a far bigger growing space. If I had oodles of money – I’d have a glasshouse just for tomatoes and aubergines – and polytunnels for everything else!


Reminder – Some ‘experts’ also fail to tell you that some varieties of tomatoes are actually meant to be bushes – and should NOT have their side shoots removed at all or you won’t get any, olr very little, fruit!  Amazingly – I saw that particular important information being completely ignored on a recent TV programme!   I’ve also seen the recommendation to « remove all side-shoots » a lot on social media lately too. Check your seed packet description of any variety before you start to remove any side shoots!


Other Crops


The small cucumber Restina – seed of which I get from Lidl – is already producing fruit this year, as I sowed it in late Feb – much earlier than normal. It’s a delicious gherkin or half-sized cucumber usually grown for pickling – but also scrumptious for eating fresh, with a really good ‘old-fashioned’ proper flavour!  I can never wait for that first cucumber sandwich of the season! Despite the difficult weather – we’ve been eating baby courgettes and mangetout peas Oregon Sugar Pod from the tunnel for a couple of weeks now, The courgette is a delicious yellow one called ‘Atena’ (which will crop until Nov.) and later in the month we’ll have French beans. I grow a climbing French bean called ‘Cobra’ which is brilliant in the tunnel – far more reliable than outside. Just one packet of ‘Cobra will give you more than enough to eat for weeks on end if you keep them well picked over and watered – and will fill your freezer for the winter as well. It’s an incredibly delicious, reliable and productive variety, DIY chain B&Q actually have the seed at half the price of anywhere else. 


I don’t bother with dwarf beans any more in the tunnel as they take up exactly the same amount of ground space, but only give you a fraction of the crop of the climbing ones – which make use of what I call ‘upstairs space’ to give you an enormous ‘high-rise’ crop. I’m sowing another late batch this week which will crop late into the autumn. The great thing about tunnels though is that they mostly protect crops from the worst extremes of the weather and all crops are far more productive under cover. In the winter this is particularly noticeable with hardier crops like chards and kales which could of course be grown outside.


I always plant basil when the chard has been cleared. I freeze masses of it to make lots of our vital ‘medicinal’ pesto during the winter months! There is a rule in this house which states ‘you can never have too much garlic, or basil’! That first whiff of summer basil is wonderfully uplifting, but I must say that years ago when I was growing it commercially, after picking the first sixty foot row of a tunnel full of it, one did begin to feel more than a little nauseous! The aroma from the essential oil can be quite overpowering after a while. I prefer to grow basil on it’s own in rows – giving it as much light and air as possible as it can be a bit disease prone in a humid tunnel atmosphere. Grown this way it’s much more productive than when grown between tomato plants, which seems to be the fashion, as I see it recommended everywhere. Maybe because they go together on the plate? 


Weeds shouldn’t be too much of a problem now as crops will be shading them out, and you should also be mulching well, which excludes light, preserves soil moisture, keeps roots cool and encourages worm activity. If you don’t mulch at this time of year the ground in the tunnel gets too hot and dry and the worms will disappear down into the lower layers of the soil where they’re cooler and more comfortable. You want to keep them in the upper layers, pulling down mulches into the soil and working for you helping to feed your plants!  Go round every day if possible pulling out the odd weed before it gets too big and goes to seed, and at the same time see what needs watering. If you’re growing a wide variety of crops some may need water every day and others won’t. This is why I dislike automatic watering systems – I think they’re a complete waste of money!  An automatic system can’t tell if a plant is waterlogged or too dry! It also can’t tell what the weather is going to be later that day! There’s no substitute for the personal touch and being observant – that’s really all that having so-called ‘green fingers’ is all about – not mystery!  I have a friend who spends far more time fiddling around fixing her automatic system than I ever do with hand watering!  It’s always getting blocked – and ten to one they invariably let you down when you go away!  If you’ve got room, put a barrel of water in your tunnel or greenhouse, so that you’ve got ambient temperature water always ready to use rather than chilling things with water from a hose. Water between plants rather than directly onto the roots, and if possible try to water well in the mornings, so that the surface has a chance to dry off before the evening when the doors are closed and the air is still.


Keep ventilating as much as possible now to keep disease at bay. Diseases proliferate in a ‘muggy’ damp atmosphere. If you’ve got a tunnel full of cucumbers on the other hand they won’t mind! They love to grow in a bathroom atmosphere! Keep the soil moist for them, as the one thing that promotes cucumber powdery mildew more than anything is a damp humid atmosphere combined with dryness at the roots. All the cucurbit family should be growing quickly now, although they’re not enjoying the last couple of really cold nights. Keep tying them in to their supports as they can quickly get out of hand. There’s also more on planting and training cucumbers and melons, and also my method of planting on mounds to avoid common root pourrit.in l’agenda du mois dernier.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Continuez à encourager la faune des tunnels &#13 ;
Mini garden under peach trees with thyme, calendula, borage and wallflower&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Des mini-jardins sous les pêchers avec des herbes &amp ; les fleurs attirent les insectes bénéfiques &amp ; les abeilles&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Vous avez encore le temps de semer beaucoup de fleurs dans votre tunnel. Vous pouvez aussi laisser fleurir et semer certaines des herbes de l’hiver dernier, comme la coriandre et le persil, ou acheter quelques fleurs en modules dans les jardineries en dernier recours. Si vous avez même des radis en cours de floraison, vous pouvez les laisser aussi – ils ont de jolies fleurs parfumées que les insectes adorent ! Les insectes aiment aussi les fleurs de coriandre et de persil. Elles aident certainement à faire venir des insectes pour la pollinisation et la lutte contre les parasites, certaines peuvent égayer vos salades et elles sont aussi très belles. Je laisse toujours une ou deux endives ou plantes de chicorée aussi si j’ai de la place au bout des rangées – les fleurs sont si belles et les abeilles les adorent ! J’ai maintenant assez de graines pour me durer dix vies ! Je garde aussi une soucoupe peu profonde ou un plateau rempli d’eau dans les mini-jardins quelque part – pour les grenouilles qui aiment vivre dans les zones humides et ombragées du tunnel et qui sont très efficaces pour manger ces petites limaces grises qui font beaucoup de dégâts ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
C’est un tel plaisir pour moi de me promener dans mes tunnels à cette époque de l’année et d’anticiper les délices de toutes les merveilleuses récoltes à venir – tout en sachant que je n’ai rien empoisonné ou endommagé d’autre pour le faire ! C’est vraiment beaucoup plus satisfaisant de cultiver sa propre nourriture tout en encourageant et en aidant la nature aussi. Si vous prenez soin de la nature, elle prendra soin de vous. Nous avons souvent tendance à oublier que nous ne sommes qu’une petite partie de la nature aussi. Si nous empoisonnons cette belle planète que nous appelons tous notre foyer, nous laisserons un héritage terrible et douloureux à nos enfants& ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
(Veuillez noter. J’aime beaucoup partager avec vous mes idées originales et mes 40 ans d’expérience dans la culture et la cuisson de mes propres aliments biologiques. C’est le résultat de nombreuses années de travail acharné et d’une expérience durement acquise. Merci.)&#13 ;

Cet article a été rédigé par et traduit par serre2jardin.com. Les produits sont sélectionnés de manière indépendante. Serre2jardin.com perçoit une rémunération lorsqu’un de nos lecteurs procède à l’achat en ligne d’un produit mis en avant.