Menu Fermer

Le jardin potager en juillet/août



July contents: Eating a seasonal ‘rainbow’ is so easy if you grow it yourself!…. Pretty Powerful Purple Potatoes!…. Keep polytunnels closed to avoid potato blight? – Don’t be daft!…   It’s the season of firsts – but also gluts!….  Soil is more precious than Gold!….  Splendid spiralisers!….  Think about next year’s ‘Hungry Gap’ now….  Carry on composting!….  Drown perennial weeds….  Keep mulching….  


&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Salade bleue&#13 ;
Purple Majesty&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Violetta
Peru Purple





Eating a seasonal ‘rainbow’ is so easy, more healthy, fresher and more delicious if you grow it yourself!


One of the greatest joys of growing your own organic vegetables is being able to eat seasonally and rediscover how really fresh organic vegetables, untainted by chemicals, should taste.  I believe it satisfies a very deep-seated need in us – and that’s not surprising since humans evolved to eat food grown by nature, in its purest form possible, in an unpolluted world – each type of food in it’s proper season. I think that all year round availability of everything has ruined many people’s anticipation and enjoyment of food.  It’s lost much of it’s excitement and has become almost boring!  These days you can find vegetables and fruits from the furthest corners of the globe on supermarket shelves which are all particular varieties chosen for productivity, uniform appearance, ability to travel without bruising and for long shelf life. They’re sadly not chosen to taste fantastic and to be as nutritious as those you can pick fresh from your own garden. They are often picked long before they are ready to eat, and are devoid of most of their natural taste and nutrients. They are mere commodities, conveniently packaged into whatever form makes them the most commercially profitable for the ‘pile it high and sell it cheap’ supermarkets! Low cost food seems to be more important to some people than food quality – but you get what you pay for!  It’s definitely worth growing a few vegetables yourself if you possibly can – even if you only have the smallest patch of ground, a tub outside on a path or a window box. 


Increasing numbers of scientific studies suggest that long-term consumption of a diet high in a wide variety of  colourful plant phytonutrients –  ‘eating the rainbow’  in other words – offers protection against the development of cancers, heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and neurodegenerative diseases. The healthy exercise and fresh air that gardening entails is also good for us – both physically and mentally!  Only organic food, free of man-made synthetic chemicals, grown in it’s natural season and then harvested at it’s absolute peak, can ever have all the properly-developed nutrients our bodies need to be healthy.  I would also suggest that chemically-grown produce and processed foods have ruined people’s taste buds – so that they have become dulled, less sensitive and discriminating. Taste is very often tied to nutrition in fruits and vegetables. Many of the aromatic compounds which actually give fruit and vegetables their wonderful array of flavours are in many cases the very same ones that give them their health-protecting phytonutrients.  And of course, as I’m always pointing out, studies by Newcastle University some years ago proved that organic fruits and vegetables are up to 70% higher in such valuable phytonutrients.


Just how wonderful is it that you can grow and eat so many things that are not absolutely delicious but are actually good for you?  We vegetable gardeners are so lucky!  Far luckier than those unfortunate people who are restricted to just buying and eating the often days or weeks old produce they can find in shops!



Pretty Powerful Purple Potatoes! 


Potatoes are one good example of a colourful veg that packs a very powerful punch in terms of both nutrition and health benefits.  In the last few years, many scientific studies have found that the antioxidant anthocyanin phytonutrients in purple potatoes like those pictured above, combined with other compounds they contain, can lower blood pressure and actually even kill cancer cells in the lab!  That’s not the only reason I’m such a big fan of them though! They look utterly fabulous and taste fantastic too!  What’s not to love as they say?  Happily a lot more people now seem to be interested in the stunning looks and health benefits of the blue and purple potato varieties. This was very much shown by the huge reaction on Twitter when I posted a tweet about the very attractive but rare variety Peru Purple. That’s why I decided to write about a few of the ones which I have personal experience of. As you will know if you’re a regular reader – I never write about anything unless I can write from my own personal experience.


I found my very first purple potatoes, Truffe de Chine – about 40 years ago in Harrods Food Hall in London of all places – which used to be a treasure trove of unusual vegetables then.  They were such an exciting find – I’d never seen them before!  Since then I’ve discovered that upmarket veg shops are always well worth investigating for interesting things to possibly grow if you’re in London, or any other large, ethnically diverse city. It’s amazing what you may find!  
I got my original elephant garlic bulb in a small fruit and vegetable shop on First Avenue in New York of all places, many years ago on a rare holiday – long before I decided that I didn’t want to fly anymore and contribute to climate change.  My very rare holidays or short trips anywhere have always included visits to the local food markets and shops, to see what treats I can find to save seeds or tubers from!  If my children are on holidays they are always instructed to do the same!  To me, such shops are just like sweet shops are to children, or handbag shops to some ‘fashionistas’!!   I can never resist that childlike urge to try to grow anything different from pips, seeds or tubers. I grew Cucamelons and Kiwanos that way many years ago – long  before anyone had even heard of them. I find it hugely amusing that certain ‘celeb veg writers’ have apparently only just now ‘discovered’ them!  I’ve been growing them since before many of them were even born – as I’ve been a keen ‘food tourist’ for years! 



I’ve always grown for taste and nutrients rather than bulk, and being an artist, looks are also important for me. After all – we eat with our eyes! As I’ve already mentioned, both looks and taste are often linked with nutrients. We don’t need to eat potatoes 365 days a year – in fact they could become boring if we ate them every day – rather than the treat they are when you grow only the very best-tasting varieties.  Food should never be boring – it should be a joy!  I like eating tasty potatoes but we don’t eat them more than two or three times a week at most – due to their high carbohydrate content.  By the way – I never, ever boil potatoes – I always steam or bake them.  Boiling potatoes means that you are pouring many of their valuable nutrients straight down the sink!  That means they’re also losing much of their flavour – which you can see very clearly if you boil the purple ones – as the water turns bright blue! We also always leave the skins on when eating any potatoes. Not only are many of the nutrients actually in or just beneath the skin – but again there’s lots of gut-healthy, satisfying fibre in them too – so it’s incredibly wasteful not to eat them!


Purple Majesty is an interesting and delicious variety that makes large tubers.  This is the particular potato which featured in the blood pressure reduction study. Unfortunately a problem with plant breeders rights means that you can’t get Purple Majesty seed tubers here in Ireland. So I’m afraid that being a bit of a rebel – I’ve always ignored that legal restriction! I’ve saved my own seed tubers for about 15 years now from some which I originally bought in a Northern Ireland supermarket about 10 years ago, and I’ve grown them ever since.  As long as you don’t sell them – that is perfectly legal!  And as long as you always ONLY save tubers for seed from the healthiest plants – you can keep your stock healthy so you won’t have problems.  Purple Majesty is a main-crop variety which really benefits from my method of starting tubers off early in pots. This gives them the longest season possible before the dreaded potato blight hits. As soon as I see evidence of blight I take off the tops, cover the bed with something waterproof and they keep really well for months that way, as long as you don’t have slug problems. They also keep well in normal cool storage if you do have slug problems. Purple Majesty retains its colour and phytonutrients well when cooked, has a lovely floury texture for making mash and a fantastic, ‘nutty’, sort of ‘baked potato’ flavour – despite being a relatively new introduction compared to some. It’s so far proven to be the highest in antioxidants of all purple potatoes and is one of the best tasting varieties too – and I’ve grown dozens of them over the years. It bakes, fries and steams well – and makes a lovely fluffy mash.


Salad Blue is another potato which is a great masher and baker too. It is an early maincrop heritage variety, thought to have been bred in Victorian times.  It’s recently become very popular again and well deservedly, and is fairly widely available online. It also keeps very well in storage, after growing my particular way. Since I invented my method of starting potatoes off early in pots to give them a long season – I have all the potatoes I need all year round using this method and I never need to use any spray for blight – even copper-sulphate.  Fruit Hill Farm in County Cork had it this year.


Violetta is a deep purple, second-early variety. It’s the earliest of the purple varieties to be ready here, and it crops well both in the polytunnel and outside. I wasn’t that impressed with the flavour of some of the non-organically grown Violetta which I tried seven years ago from a well-known Dublin food shop – but I’ve since found that growing them organically, without the chemicals that make them absorb more water, really makes a huge difference to the taste!  I got my original seed tubers from Tuckers Seeds in Devon, who used to sell a lot of different varieties of organic seed potatoes and were good about sending to Ireland – but sadly they no longer sell online and are now only open to customers at their shop in Devon.  Violetta is delicious steamed and eaten with lashings of butter – when it has a nice ‘waxy’ texture. It’s good cold too, in tortillas and potato salads. Sadly it doesn’t mash well or make good scalloped potatoes though, as it absorbs a lot of oil when cooking and doesn’t crisp up well. It’s not a bad baker though.  

Attractive Vitelotte Noire after steamingLa jolie Vitelotte Noire après la cuisson à la vapeur&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La Vitelotte Noire – (autrement connue sous le nom de Negresse ou Truffe de Chine) est une très ancienne variété patrimoniale dont la vente a été enregistrée pour la première fois au début du 19e siècle, sur les marchés de Paris – mais on pense qu’elle est à l’origine bien plus ancienne que cela. C’est également une variété de culture principale qui est assez tardive pour se développer – c’est un type de salade avec une forme longue similaire à celle de la « Pink Fir Apple » mais moins noueuse. Sa chair est d’un violet très foncé, parfois marbrée d’une couleur plus claire, et elle a un goût merveilleux. On peut parfois la trouver dans les magasins de légumes haut de gamme. La Vitelotte est plus résistante au mildiou et à d’autres maladies que beaucoup d’autres pommes de terre – elle convient donc bien à la culture biologique. C’est la première pomme de terre que j’ai trouvée parmi les séduisants étalages exotiques du Harrods Food Hall il y a de nombreuses années. Depuis, je la cultive et je l’ai transmise à de nombreuses personnes. L’une de mes préférées, j’aime aussi le fait que je cultive l’histoire&13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Peru Purple, steamed, chilled overnight & scallopedPérou Violet, cuit à la vapeur, réfrigéré pendant la nuit &amp ; escalope à l’huile d’olive&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La pourpre du Pérou est extrêmement rare et n’est actuellement disponible qu’auprès de banques de semences telles que l’Irish Seed Savers Association ou peut-être d’autres amateurs de pommes de terre – c’est là que j’ai obtenu la mienne. Il vaut la peine de le cultiver si vous pouvez le trouver ! Il est très joli avec une peau rouge-violet profond, et est d’une couleur légèrement plus claire, marbrée de blanc à l’intérieur. Bien que je n’aie pratiquement rien trouvé en ligne sur cette variété particulière – (seulement que les pommes de terre violettes viennent du Pérou !) – il semble s’agir d’un cultivar de culture principale. Je peux certainement attester qu’elle donne la purée mauve pâle la plus délicieusement moelleuse. Elle est aussi absolument LA pomme de terre à coquilles Saint-Jacques la plus fabuleusement croquante qui soit ! Elle croustille et brunit rapidement à l’extérieur tout en restant légère et moelleuse à l’intérieur. C’est un aspect de leurs qualités culinaires que vous comprendrez, j’en suis sûr. J’ai naturellement senti que j’avais l’obligation de faire des recherches approfondies pour vous ! Il fera certainement de fabuleuses frites ou chips au four……mais il faudra sans doute faire d’autres recherches à ce sujet ! Il mérite certainement d’être beaucoup plus connu et cultivé ! Si vous l’avez – partagez-le – cela garantira non seulement sa survie, mais aussi sa prospérité !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
La Blaue Annaliese est une variété beaucoup plus récente que je cultive pour la toute première fois cette année, et qui semble destinée à devenir une grande favorite, et je peux vous dire que je suis déjà complètement accrochée ! Un hybride entre la Violetta, dont j’ai parlé plus haut, et une autre variété violette – elle a été sélectionnée pour son excellente résistance aux maladies lors de ses essais de sélection et a été lancée en 2007. Nous sommes maintenant presque à la mi-juillet – il y a du mildiou partout et jusqu’à présent, elle semble en parfaite santé. Bien qu’elle soit dans le tunnel, je n’ai pas pu préparer le terrain dehors assez tôt en raison de mes problèmes de cheville – alors je croise les doigts ! Ses tubercules sont d’une si belle couleur violet/indigo-bleu foncé qu’ils sont presque noirs, et sont donc clairement très riches en anthocyanes sains. J’en ai déjà ramassé quelques uns juste sous la surface du sol en me promenant – je peux vous dire qu’ils sont absolument magnifiques cuits aussi, et qu’ils ont un beau goût sucré, presque châtain. Je pense qu’elle a certainement le feuillage le plus vigoureux et le plus sain de toutes les pommes de terre que j’ai jamais cultivées, mais il est clair qu’elle aime avoir beaucoup de place ! Elle a déjà étouffé la Peru Purple qui se trouvait à un mètre de distance ! À l’avenir, je lui donnerai un lit entier à elle seule, où elle est errante, les racines profondes ne pouvant se mélanger à aucune autre variété. Bien qu’il s’agisse d’une variété de culture principale plutôt que d’une première ou d’une deuxième variété précoce qui conviennent mieux, j’ai retenu quelques tubercules de ma plantation de printemps pour les planter la semaine suivante environ, à titre d’expérience pour les pommes de terre de Noël. Je vais faire un rapport. Les tubercules de semence étaient disponibles ce printemps auprès de Fruit Hill Farm, dans le comté de Trieste. Cork. https://www.fruithillfarm.com/seeds-and-propagation/organic-seed-potatoes/gourmet-potatoes/blaue-anneliese-organic-seed-potatoes.html&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Garder les tunnels fermés pour éviter le mildiou de la pomme de terre ? – Ne soyez pas stupide ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Purple Majesty left showing its violet-purple flesh colour - with the deeper-coloured indigo blue-black Blaue Annaliese on right&#13 ;
Blaue Anneliese looking healthy and vigorous - taking over an entire bed!&#13 ;
Purple Majesty à gauche montrant sa couleur de chair violette-pourpre – avec le bleu-noir indigo plus profond de Blaue Annaliese à droite&#13 ;
Blaue Anneliese a l’air sain et vigoureux – il occupe un lit entier !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
En parlant de pommes de terre en tunnel, je veux mettre fin à cette idée fausse une fois pour toutes ! Je ne garde JAMAIS mes polytunnels fermés pour éviter le mildiou à cette époque de l’année – parce que ce n’est pas le cas ! En fait, cela l’encourage plutôt positivement ! Comme toujours, j’écris ce blog à partir de 45 ans d’expérience personnelle, et non pas à partir d’un article stupide que j’ai lu dans un livre ! Il est impossible de garder un tunnel si étanche qu’il ne laisse pas entrer l’air. Et toute personne qui pousse dans un polytunnel peut vous dire que lorsqu’il est fermé, même par une journée ennuyeuse sans soleil à cette époque de l’année, il peut avoir l’impression d’être dans un sauna – surtout en Irlande avec notre humidité de l’air plus élevée, même si le sol du tunnel était si sec que rien n’y pousserait ! J’ai cultivé dans de nombreux tunnels de différentes tailles depuis de nombreuses années, en commençant par une petite serre d’1,80 m sur 1,80 m, couverte de polyéthylène, dans mon tout premier jardin il y a 44 ans. J’en ai maintenant deux grandes, assez hautes, avec une bonne circulation d’air, mais je peux toujours dire avec confiance qu’il n’y a pas moyen d’éteindre la lumière des pommes de terre d’un tunnel polyvalent ! Il circule toujours dans l’air à cette époque de l’année, et tout ce dont il a besoin, ce sont les bonnes conditions pour germer et pousser sur des pommes de terre ou des tomates. Ces conditions sont l’humidité et la chaleur, de jour comme de nuit pendant 48 heures – et c’est exactement ce que fait le fait de garder un polytunnel fermé jour et nuit pendant cette durée à cette époque de l’année ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
L’arrosage manuel soigneux des pommes de terre, UNIQUEMENT lorsque cela est nécessaire, dans un tunnel ou à l’extérieur, et jamais l’arrosage par le haut ou l’humidification du feuillage ne sont des mesures essentielles pour éviter le mildiou par temps chaud et sec. Les systèmes d’arrosage automatique favorisent souvent le mildiou en arrosant trop et en ne laissant jamais la surface du sol se dessécher. C’est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles je les déteste, comme je l’ai mentionné dans le blog polytunnel ce mois-ci. OK – Je sais que le fait de mettre les plantes debout et de les arroser n’est pas l’occupation préférée de tout le monde, mais non seulement c’est beaucoup moins cher qu’un système automatique, mais cela vous permet de mieux contrôler et de voir vraiment ce qui se passe avec vos cultures. Et c’est cette observation et cette connaissance qui font la différence entre être un très bon jardinier et un simple jardinier adéquat&13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
C’est la saison des « premières »….&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
First year's produce at Springmount - 1982


Nothing ever tastes quite like that very first bite of truly seasonal produce at it’s best – whether you’re a new gardener or if you’ve been growing you have grown your own food for many years! The first strawberries, courgettes, cucumbers, tomatoes, peas…etc. One of the simplest, most satisfying and most joyous pleasures in life is to be able to cultivate a garden, and to produce as much of your own food as possible – while at the same time helping all of the other creatures that are part of Nature, just as we are. Our garden here has not just been a source of sustenance for many years – but also a source of great joy, health and peace for the soul. This picture here was taken in 1983, of some of my first summer’s produce here at Springmount. It was proudly displayed on the then kitchen table. It gave me such a great sense of achievement back then – and a feeling that no matter what life threw at us – we would survive it all and feed ourselves well! …. I still hope that will be the case for many more years to come – but in the future with the erratic weather of climate change – that is definitely going to be more of a challenge! 




I could already clearly notice the effects of climate change beginning to happen here 35 years ago.  But few wanted to listen then, and many denied it – when something might still have been done to mitigate its worst effects!  In September of 1992, just after the first Rio Earth Summit that June – I organised a lecture at the National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin, Dublin.  It was given by Alan Gear – then chief executive of the HDRA (now re-named Garden Organic) – the local Irish group of which I organised at the time.  His lecture was entitled ‘The Road From Rio – Where Do We Go From Here’.  His warning was stark – act NOW or it will rapidly get worse, and all of Nature, including humans, will bear the consequences of our inaction!  Even then it was clear that soil was part of the solution – and increasingly science is showing this to be more true with every passing day.  


Restoring soil carbon through regenerative organic agriculture, by gardening organically without using climate-destructive peat products, or by supporting organic farming, are the best chance each of us has to truly be able to do something personally to help mitigate climate change.  The soil was so bad when I started growing here, after years of chemical agriculture destroying all of its carbon, that it was almost like lifeless concrete when it was dry – and like sticky glue when it was wet!   It is so much better now after 38 years of minimal digging, constant mulching and loving organic husbandry that I can plant just with my hands – I don’t need tools!  It is now completely transformed, and it is so wonderful to sink one’s hands into it, with its vibrantly alive community of creatures and microbes – truly plugging into the earth and the source of our earliest beginnings. Is it any wonder that it benefits our mental health just to feel it and to inhale beneficial microbes like Mycobacterium Vaccae – which has been scientifically proven to cure depression?  It is so sad that so many people never get the chance to experience that.


There have been many changes here since those early days. The children have grown up, various people – some much loved family, assortments of animals, and momentous life events have all come and gone.  But one thing never changes – that is that my enthusiasm and desire to learn from mistakes and successes, to constantly look for good new varieties or better selections of old ones and ways to do things even better so that I keep improving the soil with every year that passes. Also to find easier ways of growing that will allow me to continue my gardening even after accidents have left me partially disabled and now less able to do many things. Experiments continue. That’s the wonderful thing about gardening – and why it holds such a continuing fascination for me. One never stops learning and no one ever knows it all, no matter how long we do it. Nature doesn’t give up all of her secrets easily – but if you work with her – the rewards are plentiful.


Take good care of your soil – it is more precious than Gold! 


Gold can’t grow food either! We didn’t evolve to eat commodities grown with chemicals in the poisoned, impoverished and lifeless medium that conventionally farmed soils have become.  Neither did we evolve to eat foods grown in chemical hydroponic situations, with artificial light where the plants are fed with fertiliser (also often fungicidal) solutions and deprived of all the vital symbiotic bacteria & fungi that are present in a living soil which they need to produce all their proper nutrients!  To be healthy and productive – soil and all it’s microbial life needs to be replenished, encouraged and protected constantly. That’s what Nature does.


We cannot keep taking crops from soil without helping it to regenerate all those natural things it needs.  Soil is a living community of microbes – or it should be. In some parts of the planet – soil has just become a completely lifeless, carbon-depleted dust which simply holds up plants while they’re fed with chemicals. It has so little organic matter left in it that it erodes, washes away or blows away very easily. We can’t keep taking crops from the soil and not replacing all those elements that made them – any more than we could give up real food and just live on vitamins and protein supplements!  Soil loss is also becoming more and more important from an environmental, as well as from a food growing perspective, as it traps carbon dioxide and is a massive carbon sink,  so it is absolutely vital to mitigating climate change. Only a healthy, living organic soil can do this! 

If you would like to know more about how us gardeners can restore soil and by doing so help to mitigate climate-change – here’s a link to the soil talk which I gave at our National Botanic Gardens, in Glasnevin, Dublin in 2016:




The soil gave us our past and nurtured us.  We now hold its future, and ours in our hands.  We must use it more wisely.  If we keep taking more and more from it without giving anything back, what we are actually doing is robbing our own future – and so are the multinational manufacturers of these planet-polluting chemicals which are destroying it!  They don’t care about the future of our children – or even apparently theirs! Their only concern is big profits now!


The season of Plenty – but also gluts!



There is no more delightful and satisfying sight than a really well organised and productive vegetable garden at this time of year.  It’s so satisfying to stand back and look at everything after a hard day’s work. The whole garden has a summer carnival atmosphere about it – like a glorious celebration of Nature’s abundant generosity.  We’re surrounded by masses of delicious vegetables – so many luscious things to choose from that we could have several different ones in gluttonous portions every day! Mother Nature has pressed the ‘fast forward’ button and everything is growing so incredibly fast that it’s hard to choose what to eat next! 

Of course with seasonal growing and eating – gluts of many fruits and vegetables can naturally sometimes become a problem. It’s always a feast or a famine! One minute you’re dying for that very first taste of something – then all of a sudden there’s far too many! It’s a good problem to have though. In these times of fast rising prices for so many things, and even food shortages lately due to COVID19 – it’s not just a good feeling to be as self-sufficient as possible in most things. but also sensible. Particularly with the other uncertainty brought about by the forthcoming Brexit – but I won’t start on politics!  When under pressure I tend to try to find positive, practical side ways to cope!  This is when it’s so useful to have a freezer – particularly since we’re not that into chutneys or jams, all being high in sugar!  Priority for eating fresh has to be given to those that perhaps don’t tend to freeze quite as well as some others. Most things freeze well, but some veg need cooking first. 


Courgettes, which we’ve now been eating for a month from the tunnel, don’t freeze well raw but do freeze very well as a component of my caramelised roast red onion ratatouille, which is totally addictive, incredibly useful, and a brilliant standby to have in the freezer (if it makes it that far – because it’s so delicious cold it’s hard to resist! You can find it in the recipe section). It’s a terrific way to use up too many courgettes – something which always happens! They freeze very well cooked like this and are so useful to have put by to use as a side vegetable or to throw into sauces. 



Broccoli is another brilliant freezer candidate which always seems to be all ready at once – particularly the more productive F1 varieties like ‘Green Magic’ from Unwins – my all year round favourite. I pack the small individual florets into recycled plastic take-away boxes.  Donated by other people I hasten to add!  We don’t eat Chinese takeaways – but it’s amazing how many so-called healthy eaters do!  I’m not complaining though, I’m only too happy to do their recycling for them – one box holds two portions of broccoli very nicely. That way they don’t get smashed up in the freezer. There’s no need to blanch them before freezing quickly either – it just wastes nutrients!  They are perfect if tipped straight into fast-boiling water from frozen when you want to use them.   I always sow a late crop of ‘Green Magic’ calabrese this month for planting in the tunnel in September – this will give us useful pickings all through the winter if covered with a bit of fleece when a very hard frost threatens.



Some crops like climbing French beans, broad beans and peas, I tend to grow specifically for freezing – firstly because they obviously don’t grow over winter in the polytunnels but also because they are mostly unaffected by several months in the freezer, and make a very welcome change during the darkest months of the year.  They are mostly ‘squirrelled’ away for winter suppers, after enjoying the novelty of the first few platefuls of fresh ones.  It can be hard to keep up with filling the freezer as well doing all the garden jobs that all seem to need doing at once, but it will be so welcome during the long winter months when organic vegetables and fruits are scarce, expensive, depleted of nutrients and without much variety, unless they’ve come from God knows where, along with a massive carbon footprint! . It feels so good in the depths of winter to enjoy a bit of the summer’s sunshine – captured in the harvest from your own garden!




Things like pumpkins or winter squashes that will store for a long time overwinter are also a major priority crop here. They don’t need valuable freezer space either, just a cool dry place. With careful ripening they can often be stored right up until next year’s are sown or even later – increasing in vitamin A while in storage. So they are a very valuable winter staple. On the subject of pumpkins and squashes – unless you’re entering giant pumpkin competitions you don’t want huge ones, so encourage fruiting side shoots to form by pinching out the main shoot after 4-5 leaf joints. Then each of the side shoots produces flowers and that way instead of just one huge pumpkin – I get 3 or four good sized ones which store very well for the winter. Last week I had my first major basil harvest of the year, grown in the tunnel as it’s far too windy here to do well outside. To me – my vegetable garden is far more important than money in the bank. It’s so comforting knowing that I have a really good range of foods preserved for the winter.  In fact. even if I had oodles of money – I could never buy most of the things that I grow.





Spiralised courgettesMagnifiques spiralisateurs !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il y a quelques années, j’ai découvert une autre façon fantastique d’utiliser les courgettes – et je vous promets que je n’aurais jamais cru que leur goût pouvait être aussi complètement transformé rien que par la façon dont elles sont préparées ! J’ai d’abord lu un article sur les courgettes dans la rubrique de Domini Kemp dans le magazine Irish Times. Elles avaient l’air amusantes, alors j’ai acheté un modèle « Lurch » bon marché juste pour l’essayer – en m’attendant à moitié à ce que ce soit des déchets ! Je n’aurais pas pu me tromper davantage ! De fabuleux « spaghettis courgetti » en un instant – mais attention à vos doigts ! Il y a 4 ans, ma recette de juin du « Tunnel vers la table » était des spaghettis aux courgettis au pesto et elle était vraiment délicieuse (dans les sections « Recette » et « Écoutez » si vous voulez l’essayer). Les « courgetti » sont également délicieux, simplement sautés avec une gousse d’ail et un peu de sauce soja – d’après le goût, on pourrait croire que vous mangez un sauté chinois entier, ils sont tout simplement fantastiques ! La meilleure façon de les cuisiner, à mon avis, est de les faire cuire dans mon gratin de courgettes et d’oignons rouges – également dans la section des recettes. C’est ma recette la plus populaire ! Tout le monde l’adore et maintenant nous n’en avons pas assez – ce qui n’est jamais un problème en général à cette époque de l’année ! Une autre de mes recettes – mon gâteau aux courgettes et au citron – est, je pense, mon meilleur gâteau de tous les temps ! Il se conserve brillamment, s’améliore sur trois ou quatre jours (s’il dure !) et se congèle aussi fantastiquement bien. Je ne sais pas pourquoi certaines personnes se moquent des spiralisateurs – ils ne les ont clairement pas essayés correctement – ils sont brillants ! Je ne serais pas sans le mien maintenant ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Pensez dès maintenant à la « lacune de la faim » de l’année prochaine ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
En parlant des mois d’hiver, c’est maintenant que nous devons penser à la « période de soudure » de l’année prochaine ! C’est difficile, je sais, avec tout ce qui pousse si vite et tout ce qu’il faut faire en matière de tuteurage, d’arrosage, de désherbage et de paillage, etc. Il peut être difficile de se rappeler qu’un grand nombre de cultures d’hiver et de fin de printemps prennent presque une année entière pour pousser. Certaines, comme les choux de Bruxelles et les poireaux, auraient dû être semées il y a quelques mois. Tout en conservant certains des légumes tendres pour un peu de variété hivernale, nous devons penser à planter les plus résistants qui seront alors le pilier de notre alimentation. Il peut sembler étrange de penser aux légumes d’hiver à cette période de l’année, alors que nous espérons avoir encore beaucoup de plaisir en été. Mais cela nous rappelle que si vous n’y pensez pas maintenant, vous n’en aurez pas l’hiver ou le printemps prochain ! Vous devez planifier dès maintenant ce qui va suivre après vos cultures d’été – à la fois en extérieur et sous couverture – et vous assurer que vous avez les semences ou les plantes dont vous aurez besoin. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
De la mi-juin à la fin août, la plupart des graines doivent être semées pour de nombreux produits comme les chicorées, les légumes orientaux, les laitues d’hiver, etc. Si vous les semez désormais en modules en utilisant du compost de graines biologique – vous les aurez prêtes à être plantées dès que les cultures du début de l’été seront terminées – vous utiliserez ainsi au mieux votre espace de culture. Si vous n’avez pas encore semé des plantes comme les poireaux, le chou vert et les brocolis à germination violette pour la culture en extérieur, les jardineries devraient encore avoir de bonnes plantes pour le moment, mais achetez-les dès que possible, car les plantes qui traînent encore dans le coin dans un mois environ peuvent avoir été affamées ou avoir pris racine dans leurs modules et ne donneront pas de bonnes récoltes. Vous trouverez de nombreuses autres informations sur les semis à effectuer maintenant et le mois prochain pour l’hiver, ainsi que sur les cultures à croissance rapide qui doivent arriver à maturité cet automne dans la liste des semis de ce mois. Il reste aussi quelques semis de légumes qui arriveront à maturité en automne. Certains, comme les choux chinois et les radicchio, préfèrent en fait les jours de raccourcissement, après le solstice. S’ils sont semés avant, ils monteront souvent en graines à la fin de l’été (nous l’espérons !). Vous trouverez de nombreuses autres suggestions dans la section « Quoi semer » de mon blog.

&#13 ;

&#13 ;
Cabbage damaged by root fly on rightChou endommagé par la mouche des racines à droite&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il est temps de transplanter les brassicacées d’hiver comme les choux de Bruxelles, les brocolis à germination violette, les choux-fleurs, les choux verts et les choux dans leurs derniers quartiers de culture d’hiver ; si vous avez déjà les plantes – plus elles sont grandes et bien établies avant l’automne – plus vos cultures seront bonnes. N’oubliez pas de mettre des colliers de brassicacées autour des tiges pour éloigner la mouche des racines du chou et de suspendre un filet au-dessus d’elles pour empêcher les papillons blancs du chou d’y pondre leurs œufs. Si vous vous contentez de poser le filet sur les tiges, le papillon parviendra toujours à pondre ses œufs sur les feuilles les plus hautes ! Je trouve que les carrés de tapis sont les meilleurs pour faire des colliers de brassicacées, car ils sont flexibles et ne rétrécissent pas. J’ai essayé d’en faire à partir de vieilles sous-couches de tapis à envers en papier, mais lorsqu’elles ont séché un peu, l’une d’entre elles avait rétréci, si bien que la mouche des racines s’y est introduite – vous pouvez voir le résultat ici ! Vous pouvez toujours semer du chou frisé, si vous pouvez les couvrir de cloches plus tard – cela ne fera pas d’énormes plantes, mais cela peut valoir la peine de les cueillir en tant que « petites » feuilles, même si nous avons un automne froid. Les choux se comporteront également très bien pendant l’hiver dans un tunnel et seront beaucoup plus productifs qu’ils ne le seront jamais à l’extérieur. Si vous n’avez pas semé de brassicacées, un de mes amis a acheté de très bonnes plantes biologiques en ligne l’année dernière, vous pouvez donc essayer cela – ou visiter l’une des bonnes jardineries locales qui valent la peine d’être soutenues en ces temps de grands multiples de bricolage. Vous pouvez également semer des choux de printemps et des rutabagas – je trouve que le semis en modules sous un filet fin est le meilleur moyen d’éviter les parasites, et aussi que les semis puissent être étouffés par les mauvaises herbes, comme cela peut facilement arriver avec tout ce qui pousse si vite maintenant.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Lettuce 'Fristina'&#13 ;
Continuer à semer peu et souvent des salades – je sème quelques laitues en modules à chaque fois que j’en plante – cela permet de maintenir un approvisionnement régulier, car je n’aime pas me passer des ingrédients d’une bonne salade. Il y a beaucoup de bonnes salades à semer en juillet. Je fais pousser des bébés « Little Gem » parce que j’aime leur croquant et je fais aussi pousser beaucoup de types de feuilles en vrac comme la merveilleuse Jack Ice – car elles peuvent pousser pendant des mois, en particulier au printemps et à l’automne si vous les gardez bien arrosées, en prélevant juste quelques feuilles de chaque plante chaque fois que vous en avez besoin. Elles sont très utiles dans un potager ornemental, car elles sont très attrayantes et le fait de cueillir une tête de laitue entière a tendance à laisser un trou dans le schéma de plantation ! La bonne vieille ‘Lollo Rossa’ est toujours fiable pour cela, très colorée, résistante aux maladies et pleine d’antioxydants, la graine est maintenant disponible partout à bas prix – et est souvent donnée gratuitement avec les magazines de jardinage. La « Jack Ice » et la Lattughino sont mes laitues d’hiver à feuilles mobiles préférées, mais la « Fristina » (sur la photo) et la « Belize » sont également très savoureuses, vertes et résistantes aux pépins, avec de belles feuilles fermes et bien « croquantes » au milieu, et non « flottantes » comme peuvent l’être certains types de feuilles mobiles. J’ai découvert que le « Jack Ice » et le « Lattughino » passent aussi très bien l’hiver dans le tunnel, qu’ils sont très résistants aux maladies et qu’ils sont également lents à s’envoler. Le « Cherokee » est un très bon Batavian à feuilles croquantes, dont tout le monde a parlé l’hiver/le printemps dernier, en voulant savoir ce que c’était. La Nymans est une excellente variété de Cos rouge. Comme beaucoup de laitues rouges, elle semble assez rustique, a une belle saveur et finit par donner de beaux cœurs croquants au printemps, après avoir cueilli quelques feuilles à l’extérieur pendant l’hiver. Toutes ces variétés bénéficient d’une protection de la cloche plus tard en automne si elles sont cultivées à l’extérieur plutôt que dans un tunnel – davantage pour éviter l’excès d’humidité que de froid.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Chicory Sugar Loaf - Pain de Sucre&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Le Pain de Sucre est une autre chicorée de réserve que l’on préfère semer maintenant ou jusqu’à la mi-août et qui poussera bien tout l’hiver, tant à l’extérieur que sous le tunnel. Elle donne de beaux gros cœurs bien enveloppés et blanchis, comme les laitues « cos » à la fin de l’hiver et au début du printemps, avec des feuilles extérieures légèrement plus amères qui constituent un excellent tonique pour les poules en fin d’hiver. Les semis de début juillet semblent faire les plus gros cœurs – alors ne tardez pas à les semer ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Ruby chard Vulcan&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Un légume d’hiver dont je ne voudrais jamais me passer, quoi qu’il arrive, est la bette à carde – et c’est le moment idéal pour la semer pour de bonnes cultures d’hiver, avant la fin du mois de juillet. J’aime particulièrement la variété Vulcan – j’ai constaté qu’elle est bien meilleure en termes de productivité que toutes les autres bettes de couleur, qui ont tendance à fleurir très facilement à la moindre excuse. Elle est très facile à cultiver et beaucoup plus résistante que les autres variétés, à condition de lui donner beaucoup d’espace pour ses racines et de la garder bien arrosée par temps chaud, surtout dans les tunnels au printemps. Elle a la même capacité à se tenir debout que la plante à tige blanche ordinaire – et bien sûr, elle est bien plus nutritive que cela, car elle contient beaucoup des phytonutriments que j’ai mentionnés plus tôt, en raison de sa couleur rouge. Nous pensons aussi qu’il a meilleur goût&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

&#13 ;

&#13 ;

&#13 ;

&#13 ;

&#13 ;

Continuez à composter !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Continuez à collecter le compost, en le mélangeant bien comme vous le faites, en particulier si vous incorporez des déchets d’herbe qui peuvent être très humides et visqueux mis en couche anaérobie et non mélangés. Leur aspect vert très riche en azote doit être compensé par une grande quantité de carbone, de matières brunes et plus gluantes, ou de journaux, cartons, etc. déchirés. Gardez votre compost couvert, afin qu’il se réchauffe vraiment bien, en détruisant les graines de mauvaises herbes et en décomposant rapidement la matière végétale. Vous pourriez faire frire un œuf sur mes tas de compost à cette époque de l’année ! – Plus il fait chaud, mieux c’est ! Il est plus facile de faire chauffer le tas s’il est assez grand. Les bacs à compost sont bien, mais ne chauffent pas autant. Ils sont très utiles pour éloigner les rats si vous avez beaucoup de déchets de fruits qui ont tendance à les attirer. Un tas très chaud les éloigne également et, avant qu’il ne refroidisse, tout ce qui s’y trouve devrait être bien décomposé et moins attrayant pour eux. J’utilise de vieilles palettes pour fabriquer mes bacs à compost, elles laissent entrer l’air sur les côtés, puis je recouvre le dessus et le devant d’une couverture d’ensilage en polyéthylène noir de forte épaisseur. Cela empêche également la pluie d’entrer et permet ainsi de conserver tous les éléments nutritifs du compost là où je les veux. Je suis toujours étonné de voir à la télévision des « experts » qui ne couvrent pas les tas de compost. N’ont-ils pas entendu parler de la perte de nutriments, du « ruissellement » et de la pollution ? Le compost non couvert peut toujours constituer un bon amendement du sol, mais la plupart des nitrifiants auront été complètement lessivés, ce qui aura pour effet de gaspiller toute la fertilité précieuse du sol, de polluer les eaux souterraines et d’émettre des oxydes d’azote qui accélèrent le changement climatique !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Noyez vos mauvaises herbes vivaces!!&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Je ne mets pas les mauvaises herbes vivaces comme les quais, l’herbe des canapés et la queue des juments sur le tas de compost, car cela ne les tuerait pas – je leur réserve un traitement spécial supplémentaire afin de recycler les nutriments qu’elles ont dérobés à mon sol ! Je les mets d’abord dans un sac poubelle noir au soleil pour qu’elles se flétrissent et s’amassent ; je les fais cuire pendant une semaine environ, puis je les mets dans un grand baril d’eau à côté du tas de compost, avec environ un demi-sac de fumier de poulet pour qu’elles se flétrissent bien ! Ou bien vous pouvez utiliser le HLA – « activateur liquide domestique », comme l’appelait par euphémisme le merveilleux regretté Lawrence Hills ! (utilisez votre imagination – la dernière insulte à une mauvaise herbe ! !) On y ajoute tout au long de l’été et l’année suivante, tout a bien pourri, toute matière végétale fibreuse restante peut à ce stade aller sur le tas de compost avec le reste du liquide maintenant bénin utilisé comme aliment liquide, dilué à environ 10-1. Avertissement ici – couvrez-le quand il est en train de pourrir – l’odeur est épouvantable et attire les taons comme un aimant ! Mais c’est en fait très bon pour éloigner les visiteurs indésirables. Il suffit de les inviter à admirer vos tas de compost et de les remuer très vigoureusement pendant qu’ils se tiennent à côté – ça marche comme par magie ! Mais ne le mettez pas sur vos mains – ou vous ne vous débarrasserez pas de l’odeur avant quinze jours ! Il en va de même pour les aliments pour consoude, bourrache et ortie – de loin les meilleurs lorsqu’ils sont tous mélangés dans un grand baril – car les orties riches en azote aident la consoude riche en potasse à se décomposer rapidement, la bourrache fournit du magnésium précieux, et elles constituent un aliment bien équilibré pour la plupart des choses lorsqu’elles sont diluées à la couleur d’un thé faible après quelques semaines, lorsque l’odeur a pratiquement disparu.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
End of brassica bed planting of Nasturtium, Tagetes & Viola, to attract beneficial insects.Fin de la plantation de capucines, Tagetes &amp sur lit de brassicacées ; Viola, pour attirer les insectes bénéfiques. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les premiers haricots coureurs vont bientôt fleurir – mais vous n’aurez aucun problème de pollinisation si vous avez encouragé les abeilles et autres pollinisateurs dans le jardin en faisant pousser beaucoup de fleurs parmi vos légumes comme je le fais. Le « potager » ou jardin potager est également magnifique, et des fleurs comme les capucines et les altos sont également comestibles et peuvent être utilisées dans les salades &#13 ;
&#13 ;

&#13 ;

&#13 ;

La valeur du paillage

&#13 ;
&#13 ;

En parlant de haricots d’Espagne, il est important de les garder uniformément humides au niveau des racines car toute sécheresse au niveau des racines encourage la chute des bourgeons floraux. Un bon paillis aidera à maintenir l’humidité. Les tontes de gazon sont très utiles à cet égard, car elles empêchent également les mauvaises herbes de pousser. Comme je l’ai déjà dit à maintes reprises, il faut toujours poser le paillis sur un sol déjà humide, en l’éloignant de quelques centimètres de la zone de la tige directe pour éviter qu’il ne pourrisse et en l’arrosant dès que vous y mettez de l’herbe fraîchement coupée, pour éviter que les racines ne soient brûlées par la forte teneur en azote de l’herbe coupée.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Continuez à pailler tout ce que vous pouvez, car cela stoppe l’évaporation, économise l’eau, protège la surface du sol contre les fortes pluies d’été (j’aimerais bien !), encourage les vers et maintient les mauvaises herbes à terre en excluant la lumière. Les plantes et les vers aiment les paillis plutôt que le sol nu. Un bon paillis rafraîchissant permet aux vers de travailler dans les couches supérieures du sol plutôt que de disparaître plus bas, loin de la chaleur sèche de l’été. Cela signifie qu’ils rendent plus de nutriments pour les plantes disponibles pour les racines des cultures. Les vers aiment la nourriture verte – c’est bien mieux pour eux que le papier journal ou le carton, même s’ils ont aussi besoin de carbone. Je sais que beaucoup de gens utilisent des journaux sous des paillis d’herbe, mais tout ce que je peux dire, c’est qu’ils ne peuvent pas avoir beaucoup d’oiseaux dans leur jardin ! J’ai essayé cela il y a des années autour des arbustes et des buissons fruitiers, mais les oiseaux d’ici ont eu un mal fou à les gratter partout à la recherche de vers ! Le jardin a vite ressemblé à la décharge locale – alors je n’utilise plus que des tontes de gazon ! Ils se font toujours gratter mais ne sont pas si mal que ça et après quelques jours, ils se décolorent pour prendre une belle couleur marron clair !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
N’utilisez pas d’énormes paillis de fumier – cela favorise une croissance molle bien plus vulnérable aux maladies et aux limaces ! Il enfouit aussi trop profondément et étouffe de nombreux organismes vitaux qui vivent dans les couches supérieures du sol, dont les plantes ont besoin pour être en bonne santé. La majorité des bactéries qui vivent dans le sol ont besoin d’oxygène pour survivre et faire leur travail d’interaction avec les racines des plantes. Si vous leur rendez la vie difficile, vous leur rendez la tâche beaucoup plus difficile. Les tonnes de fumier non organique qui sont épandues peuvent également contenir des produits chimiques susceptibles de déséquilibrer la population de bactéries du sol. C’est une chose que beaucoup de gens ignorent. Dans chaque couche du sol, il y a quelque chose qui a spécifiquement évolué pour vivre à cet endroit particulier. Laissez-le là où il a évolué pour être – ne lui rendez pas la vie difficile !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
(P.S. J’aime vraiment partager avec vous mes idées originales et mes 40 ans d’expérience dans la culture et la cuisson de mes propres aliments biologiques. Merci.)&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Cet article a été rédigé par et traduit par serre2jardin.com. Les produits sont sélectionnés de manière indépendante. Serre2jardin.com perçoit une rémunération lorsqu’un de nos lecteurs procède à l’achat en ligne d’un produit mis en avant.