Menu Fermer

Le Potager du Polytunnel septembre – octobre 2020

Contenu de septembre : Tout végétal que vous pouvez cultiver maintenant est comme de l’argent à la banque – quoi qu’il arrive !… C’est vraiment la dernière chance pour semer sérieusement !…. Un merveilleux souvenir de 2019 – Des tomates vraiment sans frontières !…. Pourquoi j’ai lancé le Festival de la tomate totalement génial et pourquoi il est plus nécessaire que jamais !….. La sécurité alimentaire future dépend de notre contribution à la préservation de la diversité génétique …… Les tunnels polyvalents prennent encore plus d’importance aujourd’hui…. Pourquoi il vaut la peine d’utiliser un compost sans tourbe de bonne qualité…. Mes meilleures récoltes pour la productivité hivernale dans le tunnel…. Les brassicacées sous couverture…. Les patates douces…. Terreau nourricier pour les cultures d’hiver…. Économiser de l’argent en conservant les semences…. Fruits de tunnel…. N’oubliez pas que les abeilles aussi ont besoin de nourriture pour l’hiver !
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Blaue Annaliese - still looking healthy in the polytunnel&#13 ;
A basket of Blaue Anneliese gathered for supper - 22.8.20&#13 ;
Blaue Annaliese – toujours en bonne santé dans le polytunnel&#13 ;
Un panier de Blaue Anneliese réuni pour le souper – 22.8.20&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Tout végétal que vous faites pousser maintenant est comme de l’argent en banque pour l’hiver – quoi qu’il arrive

&#13 ;
The weather this August and the first couple of days of September has thrown everything at us! Despite one or two days when it was like high summer – with unbearably hot temperatures in the polytunnel – it’s mostly been wet, windy, chilly and autumn-like – even down to 0degC in there a few nights ago. It feels as if autumn has already well and truly arrived already!  I’ve had water running through the polytunnel several times over the last three weeks, so I’m grateful for any crops that are surviving without going down with disease! The French bean Cobra really hated it – turning up their toes fairly quickly, despite giving them all the air circulation possible!   The Rosada tomatoes have as always been simply wonderful. One of the best aspects of that variety is the more than usually well-spaced foliage – which allows for a lot more air to circulate and keep the bushes disease-free. It’s such a pity that it’s no longer available thanks to the greed of the big seed companies!


The most astonishing crop of all is the potato Blaue Anneliese – it’s without doubt a paragon of a potato and one that will become a mainstay here from now on!  Started off in pots on the 23rd March, as I could barely walk at the time due to my ankle being so bad, I planted it about a month later, and it’s been looking beautiful and growing vigorously ever since. In fact it’s been making a takeover bid for the entire tunnel!  I kept looking for blight but never even found a single spot.  It’s without doubt the tastiest, healthiest potato I’ve ever grown – especially of the blue/purple ones which are so beneficial for our health. Many of those are fussy divas though – and are not very blight-resistant wherever you grow them – but especially in the polytunnel.  Although I’ve dug up a couple of plants to save seed from, just in case we get an invasion of rodents which often happens when the cereal crops are harvested around us – I’ve been loath to dig up the rest while they are growing so well, and obviously swelling the crop!  I’ll have to bite the bullet in the next week or so though – as I have loads of things ike lettuces, chicories and other leafy greens which I’ve already potted on once, otherwise they would have become root bound, but they really must be planted in the next couple of weeks to get established well before the autumn equinox. Light is already decreasing dramatically and the hens are even going up to roost just after 8pm – especially on the darker wet evenings.  


At this time of year so many people are content to just wind down and enjoy the last delights of the summer crops.  Here I’m also still doing that – but also thinking ahead, to when fresh vegetables won’t be so easy to grow, or perhaps to find a good variety of, in shops or farmer’s markets – especially if there are shortages due to a possible ‘no-deal’ Brexit!  Any fast-growing veg which I haven’t already sown in the last month is being sown now, or in the queue for sowing as soon as possible!  I’m also planting more potatoes in pots as I grew none outside this year due to dodgy ankle. So when the Blaue Anneliese ar finished, it will only be new, pot-grown potatoes until next spring – but I don’t think anyone will be complaining!


It’s very easy among all this abundance to forget that winter is literally only just around the corner!  The light is visibly decreasing rapidly now though and growth is also winding down a lot from the hectic pace of summer. With so much of summer’s bounty still to be harvested and preserved, it’s so easy to forget that winter crops need attention right now – or we won’t have any!  Even this year – we’re still facing the possibility of a ‘No Deal Brexit’ – despite the political gymnastics currently going on in the UK Parliament!  If the UK does crash out without a deal, the British Retail Consortium who have studied the possible effects of a ‘No Deal Brexit’ – say that it WILL cause shortages of fresh food, due to delays at ports. Many people don’t realise that a vast amount of fresh produce both in the UK and Ireland is imported, and much of our supply comes through the UK. But ‘No Deal’ won’t mean no fresh veg here!  If you haven’t already sown some winter salads and fast growing veg – you’ve still just got time to sow some types of leaves to have some fresh salads if they’re in short supply – but only if you do it NOW!


I sometimes get criticised by people on Twitter – saying that my blog posts assume that everyone has a garden – which is very unfair criticism because I don’t!  When we rented a small semi-detached house for 2 years while we were in transition from our first garden, before we moved here, I only had a really tiny garden – but I still grew all of our own veg in pots.  I learned a huge amount from that, and understand only too well the limitations of trying to produce as much food as possible in small, or no gardens. Even now I still grow a lot of things in large pots, as it’s a great way to avoid slug damage – very important when I want to photograph crops for my Irish Garden Magazine articles. It doesn’t matter if you don’t have a polytunnel or even a garden – as long as you even have the smallest bit of outside space you can sow something useful, fresh and super-nutritious – even if you can’t be self-sufficient as much as possible as I try to be.  It really takes very little effort – but I suspect that many of those criticising me are the « I can’t » brigade, who assume that is the case – without even trying!  I often feel that if people just made the effort – it would massively benefit their mental health – which often seems not the best from the way they attack me!  There is no space so small that you cannot grow something that wiull make a real contribution to your diet and health – unless you live in a hole in the ground without even a door or a window!


The most important thing which all plants need is really good top light though – they won’t really be happy on a windowsill for more than a few days.  This is because they’re unable to photosynthesise properly and turn sunlight into the sugars they need to grow.  Lack of light makes them become weak, sickly and spindly, more prone to diseases and also far less nutritious.  A windowsill is fine for houseplants – but really no use for food plants – as it can’t produce enough food for it to be worth the trouble. If you happen to live in an apartment without even a balcony though – then sprouting seeds or growing microgreens can produce valuable, highly nutritious crops to help supplement your diet. I used to produce mung bean sprouts, alfalfa, and sunflower greens etc. for the Dublin Food Coop 35 years ago, when I was growing commercially, and they are really very easy to grow.  They do need regular consistent care though – rinsing very well several times a day – to avoid the build-up of moulds and bacteria which can cause spoilage and even potentially cause food-poisoning! 


I’ve written several articles here on the blog over the years on how you can grow in pots and tubs, or even in recycled boxes on a stepladder.  There’s very little that you can’t grow in large pots – although some plants with very long tap roots aren’t too happy in pots unless they’re dustbin or skip bag sized! But I’ve grown in those too!  Here’s a link to a blog post I wrote this April – « What if you don’t have a polytunnel or garden, can you grow anything? »  it includes a link to my stepladder gardens article elsewhere on the blog : 




Now is really the last chance for serious seed sowing!


There’s still time early this month to sow winter lettuce, oriental salads, and many other fast developing veg for crops for harvesting through late autumn up to Christmas, or even continuous cropping throughout the winter into early spring 2016 – so check out my ‘What to Sow Now’ list and get sowing now!  The longer you delay the less things will crop before the New Year – so don’t delay! – You’ll be so glad you have them during less productive times outside in the winter vegetable garden, and when organic salads in particular are almost non-existent in shops



Seedlings for autumn & winter tunnel production&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il est déjà trop tard pour que certaines cultures produisent bien cet hiver – mais il reste encore du temps pour un certain nombre d’entre elles – il n’y a donc absolument pas de temps à perdre ! Ne gaspillez pas le précieux espace du tunnel ! Je n’oublie jamais le grand conseil qu’on m’a donné il y a de nombreuses années : « Tout ce que vous ne faites pas, semez les graines », tout ce que vous pouvez rattraper, mais pas les semences. Elles ont leur propre calendrier et doivent être semées au bon moment, quelles que soient les autres distractions – sinon vous n’aurez pas de cultures d’hiver sous abri ! &#13 ;
Les cultures d’hiver en particulier peuvent vous faire économiser une petite fortune, ce qui peut vous surprendre, surtout si vous êtes le genre de jardinier qui se désintéresse généralement des cultures d’été – en achetant votre légume d’hiver au supermarché qui a été acheminé par avion d’Espagne ou d’ailleurs. Ce n’est pas sorcier – il faut juste un peu plus d’efforts, de planification et de réflexion – mais cela en vaut la peine. Essayez donc de jardiner dans un tunnel d’hiver ou dans une serre si vous ne l’avez jamais fait auparavant – je vous promets que vous ne le regretterez pas ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Même si vous n’avez pas de tunnel, de nombreuses cultures peuvent aussi être cultivées dans des bacs et des pots sous de grands cadres froids, ou même sur un balcon bien éclairé, alors il n’y a pas d’excuse. Bien avant d’avoir des tunnels multiples, je faisais pousser toutes mes salades d’hiver sous de grands cadres froids faits maison – que je fabriquais à partir de bois recyclé trouvé dans des bennes et de grands morceaux de couvertures en polyéthylène de la taille d’un lit double que j’avais demandées dans un magasin de literie il y a des années ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Certaines cultures à croissance rapide comme les épinards d’été, les légumes orientaux, les mélanges de salades rapides, le chou-rave et la roquette, etc. seront toutes récoltées d’ici novembre si elles sont semées maintenant – et pourront éventuellement continuer à être cultivées pendant l’hiver s’il fait doux. Si vous avez tendance à avoir des gels très durs là où vous vivez, vous pouvez les couvrir de toison pendant les nuits froides, mais découvrez-les pendant la journée pour permettre à l’humidité de sécher et suspendez les toisons humides pour les faire sécher – vous n’aurez alors aucune maladie, ce qui est favorisé par les conditions humides. La laitue, le cresson de terre, la mâche, les feuilles de chou en vrac, etc. ont une croissance un peu plus lente mais doivent être semés MAINTENANT pour qu’ils puissent établir un très bon système racinaire et qu’ils aient une croissance suffisante pour continuer à « tourner » pendant l’hiver. Ce sont vos piliers, qui vous permettront de cueillir des feuilles tous les quelques jours, ou tous les jours si vous avez beaucoup de plantes, et ils vous donneront une récolte lente mais continue pendant tout l’hiver. C’est pourquoi les semis en modules et en conteneurs sont une si bonne idée. Si vous attendez que les cultures actuelles soient terminées et nettoyées pour penser à semer, il sera bien trop tard. Le fait d’avoir de bonnes plantes dans des modules ou des pots prêts et en attente, pour les rentrer directement dès que les cultures d’été sont dégagées, permet d’utiliser au mieux l’espace très précieux du tunnel.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Il fera toujours beaucoup trop chaud par temps ensoleillé pour semer ou même planter une grande partie des salades d’hiver dans le tunnel, même s’il y a de la place – quelques heures de températures très élevées peuvent littéralement les « cuire » – donc semer dehors dans des pots ou des modules est la meilleure option. Je fais généralement deux semis de mes cultures préférées comme assurance. Les seules choses que je sème toujours sans faute à la mi-juillet et à la fin juillet sont les bettes à carde et les chicorées, car elles sont plus lentes – tout le reste, je le sème de la mi-août à la mi-septembre, pour qu’elles soient assez petites pour ne pas s’envoler ou monter en graines lors d’un automne chaud, mais qu’elles fassent quand même une plante assez grande pour bien pousser pendant l’hiver – même froid ! C’est un équilibre délicat, qui varie légèrement d’une année à l’autre en fonction du temps automnal et de votre climat local. Dans le sud, plus doux, vous pouvez semer quelques éléments quelques semaines plus tard, dans le nord, vous pouvez semer une semaine ou deux plus tôt, mais c’est la lumière qui régit la plupart du temps une croissance saine – donc je trouve que c’est à peu près juste.

&#13 ;

Et surtout – n’économisez JAMAIS sur le bon compost de semences – le faire est une fausse économie car cela peut non seulement gaspiller des semences précieuses mais surtout, à cette époque de l’année, vous faire perdre un temps précieux ! Si vous perdez des semis maintenant – pour beaucoup, il est trop tard pour semer à nouveau ! Et en parlant de cela…..

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Why it’s well worth using a good quality peat-free compost!



The one thing I can never stress enough is just how important it is to use a good, peat-free organic seed compost in order to have really strong, healthy disease-free seedlings. Again, as I’ve mentioned before – my favourite which is the only decent one available here in Ireland is the Klassman organic, peat-free seed compost which I get from Fruit Hill Farm, via my local distributor White’s Agri.  At this time of year it’s very easy to lose seedlings to ‘damping off’ diseases if the compost you’re using isn’t up to scratch – but I can absolutely guarantee that I never lose seedlings in that compost, unless it’s through my own carelessness. If I have to pot anything on to avoid a check if it’s allotted tunnel space isn’t yet available – then I use their excellent peat-free potting compost too. Their composts are made from composted organic green waste grown specifically for it’s production in Germany. Both the seed and the potting compost produce excellent results, the plants make really good root systems and are always really healthy. 


I’ve tried so many other dreadful peat-free organic and non-organic composts which caused much waste of expensive seed. With some it was almost impossible to have any healthy seedlings at all. I love the Klasmann compost though, it outperforms any that I’ve ever tried.  Even thirty years ago, I was very uncomfortable about using any peat-containing seed composts at all due to peat extraction’s destructive carbon footprint – especially when they also contained synthetic, fossil fuel-derived chemical fertilisers. But there hadn’t been a really good alternative until relatively recently.  Now there is plenty of choice – especially in the UK – and there is absolutely no excuse whatsoever to use peat, or any compost which contains it!  Peat use is no longer acceptable in this era of rapid climate change and more environmental awareness – there is NO excuse!


OK, so a good peat-free compost is a little bit more expensive than bog-standard peat-based composts – but is that really any excuse for destroying bogs, which are huge carbon sinks storing millions of years of carbon – which when released massively accelerates climate change? Or is it worth the cost of destroying along with them the huge amount of vitally important biodiversity which they sustain? Especially when you’re actually saving so much money by growing your own?  I personally believe it’s worth every cent because of the great results it produces!  In over 40 years of growing experience, I’ve found that chemically-fed plants in peat-based composts are far more susceptible to disease. Sadly even some of the peat-free composts made from composted bark are truly dreadful and are not organic either. 



This can be a really tricky time of year for managing vulnerable winter salad and other veg seedlings. They’re getting blown out of their modules one minute – drenched with torrential the next – and then even perhaps baked!  It does sometimes seem like an awful lot of bother looking after them – but come the middle of winter, when there’s so few decent organic salads, spinach, chards, broccoli or other veg to buy in the shops that you could easily be growing in your greenhouse or tunnel – you’ll be so glad you did! I sometimes may even have to pot some of them on twice before tunnel planting – but again it’s well worth doing. 



Just to remind you, or if you didn’t happen read my spring sowing instructions – when sowing into modules – I fill them, firm gently, water them and then make a small hole (1/4 inch or less depending on what I’m sowing) in each module with the end of a pencil or something, sow the seeds either individually or multi-sow for things like kale and salad mixes, then cover the hole with vermiculite. This keeps air circulating around the seedling stem and the surface is just slightly drier as vermiculite promotes better drainage – so it helps to prevent damping off. Cover lightly with polythene for 3 or 4 days until you can see the seedlings starting to push through the surface – then remove the cover immediately. After this – only EVER water from underneath, by sitting the seed tray or modules in a tray of water for a minute or so – don’t allow them to become saturated!!  Follow these instructions, use a good quality compost and you won’t have a problem.

Be extra careful with watering seedlings and all tunnel watering now. Over-wet compost is the main reason that ‘damping off’ happens, that and poor air circulation. Only ‘just moist’  is the rule. If somehow by accident compost gets really saturated, then there is something you can do – a simple trick I came up with many years ago. Only common sense really – but surprising how many people just wouldn’t think of doing it!  A few years ago a gardener friend, who opens her lovely garden full of rare plants and sells many of them, was terribly upset because her automatic watering system had gone wrong (I hate them!) and had practically drowned all of her plants. Even though she’d taken them out of the water and tried to drain them off to rescue them – they were so wet that they were starting to rot off and she said she would probably lose the lot. As she was a keen recycler, I told her to get every newspaper she could lay her hands on and sit the pots on a piece of kitchen towel placed on top of several layers of newspapers for a few days. It works brilliantly!  You do need a piece of kitchen towel under each pot though as it seems to act like a kind of wick  – newspaper on it’s own doesn’t work as well, or as quickly. Granted, you may lose some water soluble nutrients to a certain extent by doing this – but you won’t lose all the plants! You can always replace any nutrients lost if necessary – but it’s often hard to replace plants lost through rotting.



My top crops for winter productivity in the tunnel 


Autumn can be a tricky season for growing, as the weather can be so unpredictable, so I usually do two sowings of my favourite crops as insurance.  I want to be able to pick a good mixed salad at a moment’s notice every day over winter – and also to have a brassica of some sort to eat at least 3 times a week.The rewards for taking a little trouble are great though. There are many crops which really enjoy the winter shelter in the polytunnel. Ruby and white Swiss chards, sugar loaf chicory, celery. Welsh onions (scallions), endives, lettuce, lamb’s lettuce, Oriental leaves like mustard and mizuna, rocket, land cress, winter spinach, watercress and claytonia – which I never have to sow now as it obligingly appears everywhere all by itself anyway!  If you grow it once – you will find that it’s one of the most enthusiastic self-seeders and you’ll rarely have to sow it again. You just weed it out where you don’t want it. It even makes a great green manure which the worms really love. To me there’s no point just sowing stuff that will sit there all winter and then crop only in the spring. Many indispensable soft herbs like parsley and also perennial herbs like thyme are also far more productive inside.


I like to have plenty of green leaves to feed my hens all winter too. They get extra greens all year round but it’s especially important in the winter as it keeps the egg yolks a really deep orange, meaning they’re much higher in nutrients like Vitamin A and lutein. Unlike conventionally-produced hen ration – organic hen food is not allowed to contain any artificial colourants to make yolks yellow. If they don’t get extra greens or are not on good pasture with fresh grass to eat every day, like some poor, non-organic, ‘so-called’ free range hens – then the yolks are much paler as grass grows more slowly and is less nutritious in the winter and that means that the hens are less healthy too. My hens are happy and bursting with organic good health all year round!






A Wonderful Memory from 2019 – Tomatoes truly without borders!


 
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Vue des deux côtés de l’exposition record mondial de tomates pour le Festival de la tomate de 2019 qui s’est tenu dans le Jardin botanique national de Glasnevin à Dublin

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
I’m really missing ‘The Totally Terrific Tomato Festival’ this year, which we couldn’t hold due to Covid19 pandemic. 


So I’m repeating the pictures from last year –  when we didn’t just have one great day – but once again two  fantastic weeks, thanks to our wonderful National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin, Dublin, their dynamic director Dr. Matthew Jebb and his hardworking staff.  It was a stunning sight, all beautifully displayed sitting in terracotta pots. A new world record of  261 varieties was set – surpassing the 2018 total of 258!  There was an incredible diversity of almost every possible combination of shape, size and colour of the rainbow!  It was beyond my wildest dreams that we could ever have achieved this when I originally conceived the idea of holding the first ‘TTTomFest’, as it is now known, back in 2012! 


For me – the most wonderful thing of all was watching the faces of people from all over the world, full of wonder as they gazed at the fantastically diverse array of colours, shapes and sizes of tomatoes! Just like children looking at Christmas trees!  I met interested people from all over the world again – all who loved tomatoes – and even some who didn’t think they did until they saw these!  The truly great thing about tomatoes, as I’ve so often said, is that almost everyone eats them and cooks with them – and almost anyone who has a garden also grows them. So we all have instant common ground no matter where we hail from!  


The really encouraging thing was that people were all so interested and grateful when I explained that the reason why I started the original Tomato Festival was to highlight the issue of the loss of vital crop genetic diversity – not only in tomatoes. Tomatoes just happen to be a very visually appealing and fun way to demonstrate that richly valuable and irreplaceable diversity.  After all – different varieties of wheat, for instance, all look pretty much the same don’t they? So they wouldn’t be as much fun to most people – unlike these gorgeous, plumptious, incredibly diverse beauties!  The wonderful thing about tomatoes is that it doesn’t matter where people are from – most people eat some tomatoes occasionally (or a lot in our case!).  As Dr Matthew Jebb said a couple of years ago in his Tomato Talk at Killruddery – the entire human race eats half its own weight in tomatoes every single year. That is a staggering statistic – and if that doesn’t give us something in common with practically every other person on the planet – I don’t know what does!  


Everyone eats – and what is most relevant is that whatever ‘diet’ we eat – whether it’s healthy or not – completely depends on the original seeds needed to grow a particular crop. This is of course the major reason why the huge multinational agri-chemical/seed giants want to gain control over the supply of our seeds, and are increasingly buying up smaller seed companies in order to control seed availability and increase their profits. Forget money, forget oil and forget politics.  Owning the supply of seeds which produces all of our food globally is the surest way to ultimate power over the human race!





It was another fantastic demonstration of just what a lot of keen growers can do when they get together to work towards one goal – and such a delight that it was hard to tear my eyes away from such a gloriously colourful panorama!  Let’s hope that next year the Pandemic will be over and we’ll be able to hold this fantastic event again – and make it even bigger and better!

I truly feel that ‘The Totally Terrific Tomato Festival’ is now in the safest possible hands – many years after I held my first ‘Tomato Day’ at the National Botanic Gardens in the early 1990s, which was the original seed of this wonderful Festival.  It has now returned to its roots – back to the original place where it was first conceived.  I am so grateful and thrilled and feel confident that it’s future is assured….. And I can’t tell you what a good feeling that is!



Why I started the Totally Terrific Tomato Festival and why it’s needed now more than ever!


This is a short extract from my ‘Tomato Talk’ on the main tomato day.  I first organised what I then called a ‘Tomato Day’ back in 1993 at the National Botanic Gardens, at Glasnevin in Dublin.  Many of us organic growers and gardeners had already been aware for some time of the loss of 1000s of seed varieties since the mid 70’s when Lawrence Hills first established the Heritage Seed Library of the HDRA –  and were aware even then of the urgency of preserving as many older varieties of seed as possible.  After the original tomato day I held at The National Botanic Gardens in 1993 – although there was some interest – it wasn’t really enough to bring it to the attention of the wider public. So there it rested for a couple of decades. 


Fast forward to 2012 – and I began to feel that people here were beginning to become far more interested not just in where their food came from, but also in the different flavours, culinary and health-promoting qualities of the many Heritage varieties that were still in existence. By a stroke of pure luck – that year the amazing high-anthocyanin black tomato Indigo Rose also became available to amateur gardeners for the very first time. I knew as soon as I saw it that January that it would be an instant attention grabber, so sent off to the USA for seed, and I believe became the first person in Europe to grow it!  I also knew that by then, preserving genetic diversity was becoming ever more urgent. With increasing climate change and the attempted takeover of global food systems by huge and aggressive multinational agrochemical/seed corporations.  It’s now more vital than ever to preserve genetic diversity in all food crops including tomatoes – with such huge economic and dietary relevance. Anyway – I knew I could no longer stand idly by and watch this happening without feeling that I was at least trying to do something. I am only one person and can only do so much – but if each individual does one small something then that can add up to a very positive BIG something!  


I don’t know who actually first said « That it is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness » – but I believe that to be very true. In 2012, I felt I had to have another try to light that candle while there was still time – to help raise awareness of how important genetic diversity was – and how it was increasingly being threatened by global ‘Big Ag’.  So the ‘Totally Terrific Tomato Festival’ was re-born under its current name.  The candle is now burning brightly thanks to our wonderful National Botanic Gardens – to my lasting gratitude.


Future Food Security depends on us all helping to preserve Genetic Diversity


Genetic diversity should not be entrusted to the ‘care’ of a few large multinational chemical/seed corporations who have been gobbling up smaller seed companies systematically since the 1970s. They are only interested in profit and selling the varieties which they have bred or happen to own the patents to! We have already lost far too many crop varieties because of this. Profit for the privileged few who control our food system could mean starvation for the many.  We have no idea what the future may bring and we each need to do our bit – however small that may be – if we care about future generations.

But food security isn’t just about tomatoes – useful and delicious as they are! Recently I posted this tweet on Twitter:

« If you’re buying #seeds à semer hiver légumes essayer de soutenir les petits &amp ; organique les entreprises de semences si vous le pouvez – semences diversité contribue à garantir futur sécurité alimentaire – Multinationale mondiale chimique/semences les entreprises rachètent de petites entreprises de semences – elles les ferment &amp ; elles abandonnent les variétés ! »&#13 ;
&#13 ;
À en juger par le nombre de retweets, il semble que les gens se rendent enfin compte que nous ne pouvons pas faire confiance à la sécurité de notre approvisionnement alimentaire pour l’avenir aux griffes avares de quelques multinationales semencières/chimiques géantes et égoïstes. Nous n’avons aucune idée des défis que l’avenir pourrait nous réserver en termes de parasites et de maladies – en particulier avec les défis du changement climatique – et il est donc extrêmement dangereux de restreindre le choix des gènes (ou des caractéristiques) – présents dans les différentes variétés de toute culture de base qui est vitale pour l’avenir de la santé humaine, voire même pour la survie. Si nous permettons que cela se produise en ne faisant rien, nous laissons progressivement s’éroder ce qui est essentiellement notre propre système de survie des variétés de cultures &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Comme je l’ai si souvent souligné par le passé, notre choix de variétés dans les différentes cultures que nous pratiquons est aujourd’hui continuellement érodé par ces entreprises. Leur motivation est le profit MAINTENANT – et non l’avenir de la diversité génétique ! Elles achètent continuellement de petites entreprises de semences, puis les ferment, reprennent leurs listes de semences, réduisent leur diversité et abandonnent progressivement les anciennes variétés de cultures importantes qui ont peut-être plus de valeur génétique, au profit de leur seule variété hybride F1 ou OGM/GE brevetée. Ils ne peuvent pas breveter les anciennes variétés – ils les pillent donc pour quelques gènes ou caractéristiques qui sont utiles à la sélection de nouvelles variétés dont ils peuvent ensuite détenir le brevet. C’est là que se trouve l’argent, et non dans la vente de vieilles variétés très appréciées et fiables comme celles qui sont illustrées ci-dessous, qui sont cultivées depuis des siècles peut-être !
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Ananas Noir&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Green Cherokee



Ananas Noir : pas facile mais délicieux !



Le Green Cherokee est un autre steak de bœuf préféré, au goût délicieux.

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Nyagous&#13 ;
Pantano Romanesco&#13 ;
Nyagous – saveur fumée riche et inhabituelle.&#13 ;
Pantano Romanesco – mon bifteck « île déserte » si je suis obligé de n’en choisir qu’un seul !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les polytunnels ont encore plus de succès maintenant &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Après l’excitation de la Fête de la Tomate, c’est certainement le retour à la terre avec une bosse – mais la terre est exactement là où j’aime être ! Maintenant que j’ai un peu récupéré, je dois rattraper le retard que j’ai pris sur certains travaux qui ont été plus qu’un peu négligés au cours de la dernière semaine. Il est urgent de le faire maintenant – si nous voulons manger de la nourriture locale cet hiver ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
C’est en septembre que nous, les tunneliers « tous temps », nous nous mettons vraiment au travail ! Si vous y réfléchissez, travaillez et prenez soin de vous dès maintenant, vous profiterez des délices des abondantes récoltes du tunnel, non seulement en été, mais aussi tout au long de l’hiver, en récoltant bien plus que ce que les jardiniers du « beau temps, seulement en été » ont jamais pensé pouvoir faire ! Pas un centimètre d’espace précieux dans le tunnel ne doit être gaspillé, surtout en hiver. Chaque centimètre devrait servir à faire pousser quelque chose de délicieux pour nous ou de la nourriture de valeur pour les abeilles qui ne butinent pas – et il est tout à fait possible de faire les deux ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

L’intérêt de cultiver des brassicacées sous couverture

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Vous pourriez trouver étrange de faire pousser du chou frisé et d’autres brassicacées sous couvert. Ils pousseront en dehors, je vous l’accorde, mais le chou frisé, en particulier, ne sera pas aussi productif. Dans un tunnel, la plupart d’entre eux produiront continuellement d’énormes récoltes ! À l’extérieur, la plupart des hivers, vous n’aurez que quelques cueillettes de certains, même si le temps n’est pas trop mauvais – ni en les gelant à fond, ni en les noyant. Il me faudrait probablement quatre fois plus d’espace à l’extérieur pour produire la même quantité de récolte que celle que je tire des plantes qui poussent à l’intérieur. Grâce à la protection contre les éléments, le chou frisé et le calabrais/brocoli profitent pleinement de la vie sous abri (qui ne le ferait pas ?) et cela vous permet de cueillir continuellement pendant tout l’hiver. Je cultive du Cavallo Nero, du chou frisé rouge et ma propre souche de chou frisé Ragged Jack, que je cultive depuis plus de 30 ans maintenant – originaire de la HDRA Heritage Seed Library – en conservant mes propres semences tous les deux ans. J’ai également créé ma propre souche hybride de choux de différentes couleurs que je teste en ce moment et qui ont tous une grande saveur. Le chou frisé et le brocoli sont deux des meilleures cultures que vous pouvez cultiver pour votre santé. Ils sont très nutritifs, car ils regorgent de vitamines, de minéraux et de phytonutriments bénéfiques tels que les isothiocyanates, dont il a été démontré qu’ils préviennent de nombreuses maladies comme le cancer. J’aime en avoir beaucoup à manger toute l’année, que ce soit sous forme de feuilles de bébé à utiliser dans les salades et les smoothies, ou légèrement cuites à la vapeur lorsqu’elles sont plus grosses. Ou même sous forme de « chips au chou » (un délice !). Ma propre variété de chou frisé Ragged Jack, que je conserve depuis environ 35 ans, produit également de délicieuses pousses de fleurs au début du printemps. Celles-ci sont bien plus tendres et délicieuses que n’importe quel brocoli en germination – presque comme des asperges !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
L’autre brassica que je fais toujours pousser en hiver est le calabrais/brocoli Green Magic. Au cours d’un hiver doux, il produit une grosse tête centrale à la fin de l’automne, puis beaucoup de petites pousses latérales, lentement mais sûrement, jusqu’au printemps suivant. La « Green Magic » est celle que j’ai trouvée la plus adaptée à cette culture, qui ne pousse normalement pas du tout à l’extérieur pendant l’hiver. Si vous la semez fin juillet, elle donnera une très bonne récolte en tunnel à la fin de l’automne, mais même semée maintenant, elle continuera à produire de petites pousses sucrées tout l’hiver, qui sont délicieuses à cueillir crues ou légèrement fumantes. Il y a quelques années, j’ai découvert que suivre les brassicacées avec des patates douces fonctionne très bien – parce que les patates douces sont un peu difficiles au début ! Si vous êtes trop gentil avec elles lorsqu’elles sont plantées pour la première fois, elles produisent des masses sauvages de feuilles luxuriantes – avec très &#13 ;
avec très peu de tubercules en dessous plus tard. J’ai fait une expérience en laissant un chou frisé au milieu de la plate-bande, ce qui a consommé beaucoup de nutriments et a empêché les patates douces de pousser de manière trop luxuriante au début. Le chou frisé peut être laissé dans le sol au moment de la plantation des patates douces, ce qui permet de continuer à produire pendant une bonne partie de l’été si les patates douces sont arrosées régulièrement. Si le chou devient trop grand, vous pouvez lui couper la tête avec une paire de cisailles. Cela ne vous dérangera pas et fera germer de belles jeunes pousses fraîches à partir des tiges tronquées, même s’il fait assez chaud dans le tunnel ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
J’aime expérimenter différentes sortes de cultures intercalaires et de chevauchement des cultures. Je trouve souvent des choses inattendues qui fonctionnent bien dans le cadre de mes rotations – qui utilisent au mieux l’espace et suppriment complètement la « lacune de la faim » dont tout le monde se plaint au printemps. Il n’y a rien de tel ici – il y a toujours quelque chose de bon à manger. Les adeptes de la permaculture ont inventé un nouveau nom pour cela : la « polyculture ». En gros, c’est exactement la même culture intercalaire, la culture dérobée et le chevauchement des cultures que je fais depuis plus de 40 ans maintenant – faire pousser toutes sortes de choses ensemble, faire pousser des fleurs et des fruits supérieurs permanents dans le tunnel aussi – en tirant le meilleur parti de chaque centimètre. C’est encore plus important sous couverture, où l’espace a un prix ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Tirer le meilleur parti de votre espace sous couvert est une question de planification. Vous devez penser plusieurs mois à l’avance aux cultures suivantes lorsque vous plantez quoi que ce soit. Les précieux espaces sous tunnel doivent être aussi productifs que possible tout au long de l’année.&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

En savoir plus sur les patates douces

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il est temps de donner à vos patates douces un peu plus de TLC maintenant. Elles ont besoin d’être nourries avec de l’engrais pour tomates une fois par semaine à partir de maintenant si elles veulent produire beaucoup de gros tubercules. Le fourrage certifié biologique « Osmo » est parfait – c’est encore un produit que j’utilise depuis des années. Tout le monde aime ça et on n’a jamais de déséquilibre nutritionnel comme on peut souvent en avoir avec d’autres aliments non biologiques. Vous pouvez utiliser de la nourriture pour consoude faite maison si elle est faite à partir de la variété à haute teneur en potasse « Bocking 14 » développée par le fondateur de Garden Organic, Lawrence Hills. D’autres variétés ne seraient pas très utiles pour cela, car leur teneur en potasse est bien plus faible. Les patates douces sont très faciles à cultiver – l’astuce est de ne pas les nourrir beaucoup au début mais d’attendre que les jours commencent à raccourcir en août, car c’est à ce moment qu’elles commencent à développer leurs tubercules. C’est une fantastique « culture de rupture » dans la rotation en tunnel, car elle n’a aucun rapport avec le reste et les vers adorent les petits fils comme les bouts de racine laissés après la récolte. Je constate toujours une énorme augmentation de l’activité des vers après les avoir fait pousser dans n’importe quel lit. Les vers ont évidemment aussi une dent sucrée ! &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
J’ai essayé beaucoup de nouvelles variétés, mais je reviens toujours à mon ancienne et fiable « Beauregarde ». J’en garde quelques tubercules pour produire des « bordereaux » que je planterai l’année prochaine. Je l’ai fait avec succès l’année dernière et je les ai donnés à plusieurs amis. Je dois en cacher quelques-uns pour qu’on ne les mange pas tous … S’ils sont stockés à plus de 50 degrés F, ils se conserveront très bien jusqu’au printemps prochain et au-delà. J’ai même gardé les violettes pendant un an et j’en ai pris des pousses ou des glissades ! Ne gardez jamais les patates douces au frigo, elles meurent d’hypothermie ! Beaucoup de gens ne se rendent pas compte que les légumes sont encore vivants après leur récolte. Comment pensez-vous que nous cultivons les pommes de terre autrement ? Il n’est pas nécessaire de faire pousser les patates douces dans la terre non plus – mais elles aiment les racines profondes, donc elles aiment un grand récipient rempli de compost bien drainé. Le feuillage dépasse du bord, cachant les sacs, et elles sont très décoratives avec des soucis et du basilic violet plantés dedans, surtout quand elles produisent leurs belles fleurs mauves en forme de convulvules.. ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Un sol nourricier pour les cultures d’hiver&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il est payant de conserver un peu de votre meilleur jardin ou de votre meilleur compost de vers de terre pour les plates-bandes où pousseront vos cultures de salades d’hiver. Beaucoup d’entre elles ont un système racinaire fin qui apprécie un peu de confort et si vous êtes aussi gentil que possible avec elles, elles continueront à pousser beaucoup plus longtemps au début du printemps, avant de se mettre à fleurir. Il suffit de gratter un léger revêtement et de l’arroser légèrement pour raffermir le sol avant de planter. Vous pouvez éventuellement ajouter une très légère couche d’un engrais organique général comme l’engrais granulaire « Osmo Universal » – qui est certifié biologique – si vous pensez que le sol est particulièrement gourmand. Il est disponible dans plusieurs jardineries. Mais ne suralimentez jamais les cultures d’hiver, donnez-leur juste assez pour qu’elles puissent démarrer sans être affamées. Le fumier, le compost ou les engrais composés sont gaspillés, souvent polluants et peuvent être contre-productifs, car il n’y a pas assez de lumière pour que les plantes puissent faire une photosynthèse efficace afin de transformer les nitrates disponibles en sucres pour leur donner l’énergie nécessaire à leur croissance. Il en résulte que les cultures ont souvent un goût amer en raison de la forte teneur en nitrates des feuilles. La suralimentation peut également favoriser une croissance molle, sape et sujette aux maladies, qui est également beaucoup plus attrayante pour les parasites. Je pense depuis de nombreuses années que la suralimentation en azote est la raison pour laquelle les légumes non biologiques peuvent avoir un goût amer et une odeur vraiment dégoûtante lorsqu’ils sont cuits, surtout en hiver. C’est particulièrement le cas des choux de Bruxelles – et je pense que c’est la raison pour laquelle tant de gens les détestent ! Je n’ai jamais eu de choux de culture biologique qui ont un goût amer comme ceux cultivés chimiquement. Les choux biologiques sont toujours très sucrés, à condition qu’ils ne soient pas trop nourris de fumier riche en nitrates trop tard dans la saison. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il y a quelques années, j’avais l’habitude de recevoir les amis Montessori de mes jeunes enfants pour les repas – ils mangeaient souvent des choses comme des épinards et du chou ici, qu’ils ne toucheraient jamais normalement à la maison, si ce n’était pas des gens qui mangeaient normalement des aliments biologiques. Une discrimination naturelle instinctive peut-être – un avertissement évolutif de ne pas manger des choses qui ont un goût amer au cas où elles seraient vénéneuses ? Et naturellement – les fruits et autres choses sauvages sont bien plus sucrés et contiennent un maximum de nutriments lorsqu’ils sont bien mûrs. C’est peut-être la raison pour laquelle les enfants semblent préférer les aliments biologiques sans produits chimiques, avant que leurs papilles gustatives et leur discrimination instinctive ne soient « civilisées », émoussées et détruites par la malbouffe ? Je le pense vraiment – je n’ai jamais eu de problèmes de « choix alimentaires » avec mes enfants. Ils mangeaient tout ! Quoi qu’il en soit – les parents des camarades de classe de mes enfants étaient tous simplement étonnés – mais lorsque je leur ai expliqué que mes légumes étaient en fait plus sucrés parce qu’ils étaient biologiques – beaucoup d’entre eux ont demandé s’ils pouvaient les acheter, puis sont devenus des clients de longue date lorsque j’ai commencé à les cultiver commercialement. La plupart, plus de 35 ans plus tard, sont toujours des consommateurs bio engagés, même si leur progéniture, comme la mienne, a depuis longtemps fait son nid !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Aération, arrosage soigneux &amp ; un bon entretien ménager est maintenant essentiel pour tenir les maladies à distance&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
En cette « saison de brumes et de fécondité douce », il est facile d’être si distrait en profitant de toute la « fécondité » qu’on oublie que les « brumes » peuvent traîner toute la journée – en particulier dans un polytunnel ! N’arrosez que si vous devez absolument le faire – et si vous le faites, faites-le le matin si possible et entre les deux – et non pas directement sur les plantes. L’humidité de surface a ainsi une chance de s’évaporer avant la fermeture des portes la nuit. Un entretien ménager scrupuleux est également absolument vital maintenant. Enlevez immédiatement tout débris de plantes mortes ou malades pour éviter le développement de maladies fongiques qui pourraient infecter les cultures d’hiver que vous allez planter au cours du prochain mois environ. Une bonne ventilation est aussi absolument essentielle, je ne ferme les portes que la nuit (nécessaire pour éloigner les renards et les blaireaux qui ont un penchant particulier pour les fraises et les pêches tardives qui poussent encore bien) et je les rouvre dès le matin. tant qu’il n’y a pas trop de vent.&#13 ;

Économisez de l’argent en conservant vos propres semences

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
A truss of 'Pantano Romanesco' - the largest 4 fruits weighed 11-14ozs each!Une ferme de « Pantano Romanesco » – les 4 plus gros fruits pesaient chacun entre 11 et 14oz !&#13 ;
&#13 ;

C’est le moment de l’année où il faut conserver les semences de tomates. Vous pouvez économiser beaucoup d’argent en faisant cela – et vous n’avez pas besoin de faire beaucoup d’efforts et de vous donner la peine de faire tremper, de laver ou de faire quoi que ce soit d’autre. Faites simplement ce que la nature fait – laissez la pourrir ! La nature ne rince pas les graines dans de l’eau chlorée. Le processus naturel de maturation, puis de fermentation lorsque le fruit commence à pourrir, est ce dont la graine a besoin pour surmonter tout inhibiteur de germination inné. Cueillez les fruits les plus mûrs possibles – mettez-les sur le rebord de la fenêtre de votre cuisine, au soleil, dans un pot de yaourt ou autre – et laissez-les pourrir ! Mettez-le dans un endroit où les souris ne pourront pas y pénétrer et où les inévitables mouches des fruits ne vous dérangeront pas – et n’oubliez pas de l’étiqueter ! Si vous faites partie de ces gens qui doivent avoir des désodorisants horribles et asthmatiques partout pour masquer des odeurs parfaitement naturelles, alors vous ne lirez probablement pas ceci de toute façon ! Lorsque le produit est vraiment malodorant et pourri, il suffit d’écraser les graines dans un petit tamis, de les rincer sous un robinet pendant un moment en remuant un peu la chair pour en éliminer les morceaux, de retirer la peau restante et de les déposer sur deux couches d’essuie-tout. Mettez ensuite les essuie-tout sur un séchoir à gâteaux ou quelque chose de similaire pendant quelques jours pour les faire sécher. Si vous faites plusieurs variétés à la fois, écrivez immédiatement le nom de la variété sur l’essuie-tout avec un marqueur indélébile ! Lorsque tout est complètement sec, il suffit de plier le papier et de le mettre dans une enveloppe marquée. C’est simple ! C’est un régal, et la graine dure des années, collée à son essuie-tout, d’où vous pouvez l’éplucher individuellement. Si vous ne voulez même pas rincer la chair malodorante, vous pouvez en fait simplement écraser les graines directement sur le papier sans rincer du tout, et c’est tout aussi réussi !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
N’oubliez pas que vous ne pouvez pas conserver les semences des variétés hybrides F1, car il s’agit de croisements effectués entre deux parents connus spécifiques. Si vous conservez des graines de ces variétés, elles ne feront que produire des centaines de bâtards différents, pour la plupart insipides, voire amers, et qui ne valent généralement pas la peine d’être cultivés ! Dans un environnement normal de tunnel, les semences de tomates non F1 restent normalement fidèles à leur type, ce qui vous permet de conserver les semences de ces variétés en toute sécurité et de vous faire économiser beaucoup d’argent ! Faites une recherche sur Google pour vérifier s’il s’agit de F1 si vous n’avez pas le paquet de semences et que vous n’êtes pas sûr. La superbe variété italienne de beefsteak Pantano Romanesco (ma tomate des îles désertes !), illustrée ici, est une variété dont vous pouvez facilement conserver les semences &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Des fruits de tunnel en abondance encore&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
late peaches - variety unknown&#13 ;
C’est la sensationnelle pêche tardive que j’ai achetée tout à fait par hasard ! Je n’ai aucune idée de la variété dont il s’agit – je l’ai achetée à Lidl, étiquetée comme une nectarine, mais c’est la pêche la mieux parfumée que j’ai ! Elle mûrit un peu plus lentement que celle du début de l’été, ce qui est mieux, et nous permet de manger plus frais sur une plus longue période, plutôt que d’avoir à faire face à une énorme surabondance en une seule fois. Le seul problème, lors d’un automne très humide, c’est que les fruits peuvent avoir tendance à se fendre avec toute l’eau qui se trouve à leurs racines – ce qu’ils font maintenant – et il faut donc les traiter rapidement pour éviter de les gaspiller ! Je suis en train de déshydrater le dernier fruit de la récolte de pêches aussi vite que possible – car depuis que le champ à côté des tunnels a été récolté, nous avons aussi maintenant un fléau de souris affamées et notre chat inutile n’a eu aucun effet dissuasif – il a donc été rendu à une très gentille vieille dame qui a perdu le sien et qui était ravie d’avoir notre chat de salon très pointilleux et affectueux ! D’ailleurs, le chat est également ravi !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les framboises d’automne en pot continuent de fructifier exceptionnellement bien dans les mêmes pots avec très peu de nourriture ! Elles ont l’avantage d’être à la fois totalement à l’abri des merles en maraude et aussi des coups de vent d’automne et des pluies torrentielles – qui souvent battent et ruinent les récoltes tardives à l’extérieur. J’adore la framboise Sugana de l’éleveur Lubera – qui est incroyablement productive et vraiment délicieuse. Bien qu’elle soit chère à l’achat – elle est déjà plus que gagnée – elle est conservée dans d’énormes récoltes d’énormes fruits qui gèlent aussi bien ! Je fais également pousser mes framboises favorites « Joan J » et « Erika » dans des pots – encore une fois, elles sont très productives et je pense qu’elles ont tout simplement l’avantage du goût. C’est une façon d’allonger la saison qui est très utile. L’un des grands avantages de « Joan J » est que ses tiges sont complètement lisses et sans épine dorsale, ce qui est important lorsque l’on travaille de près dans un tunnel ou si vous avez de jeunes enfants qui aiment les framboises !
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les raisins mûrissent aussi rapidement maintenant et nous en mangeons autant que possible frais. Les souris sont particulièrement friandes de raisins, surtout les meilleurs raisins noirs comme le Muscat Bleu et la Fraise Noire. À mesure qu’ils mûrissent, tous les raisins sont congelés en vrac pour les smoothies, etc. ou transformés en raisins secs ou en raisins secs par déshydratation dans mon déshydrateur Sedona. Les groseilles à maquereau semées au printemps mûrissent rapidement et continueront jusqu’en décembre, tout va bien maintenant avec une alimentation occasionnellement riche en potasse. Elles se conservent pendant des mois dans leurs petits étuis à lanternes en papier, que les souris n’ont pas encore découverts ! Je me demande combien de temps cela va durer?&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Les fraises perpétuelles d’Albion et de Mara des Bois produisent toujours de manière fiable leurs délicieuses baies – les gens doivent être fatigués de m’entendre dire à quel point elles sont merveilleuses. Elles ne cesseront de fructifier que lorsqu’il fera vraiment froid en novembre. Je m’en tiens à ma règle de ne jamais gaspiller un centimètre d’espace précieux dans le tunnel – à cette époque de l’année, même mes bancs de multiplication sont reconvertis en une autre possibilité de culture fruitière ! Albion est en train de produire plus de fraises dans de grands pots et des bacs !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

N’oubliez pas que les abeilles ont aussi besoin de nourriture pour l’hiver !

&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Pensez à planter des fleurs d’hiver comme des altos et des pensées pour les bourdons hivernants qui ne hibernent pas et tout autre pollinisateur d’importance vitale qui pourrait se trouver dans les environs si l’automne est doux. Vous serez surpris de voir combien d’entre eux viendront régulièrement dans votre tunnel lorsqu’ils sauront que vous avez des fleurs tout l’hiver. C’est formidable de les voir et de savoir que vous les aidez à survivre ! Sans eux, nous n’aurions pas beaucoup de nourriture ! Maintenez les fleurs annuelles comme les soucis, la bourrache, la gale, etc. en fleurs aussi longtemps que possible en les étêtant ou en les coupant un peu pour qu’elles ne montent pas en graines – il y a encore beaucoup de syrphes, de papillons, de papillons de nuit et d’abeilles qui apprécient vraiment le nectar et qui éliminent les parasites. Il y a aussi beaucoup de jeunes grenouilles qui s’activent maintenant à sauter le long des « couloirs à grenouilles » de mauvaises herbes que je laisse entre les planches sur les bords arrière des plates-bandes latérales surélevées et les côtés du tunnel. Elles apprécient l’humidité qui y règne et l’abondance de petits insectes, ainsi que leurs petits « jardins d’étang » que je fais dans des soucoupes de plantes au bout du tunnel. Ils sont parfaits pour nettoyer ces vilaines petites limaces grises qui s’introduisent dans les cœurs de laitue et les ruinent. Je garde juste les mauvaises herbes coupées au niveau du lit, entre le lit et le côté du tunnel pour les empêcher de semer, plutôt que de les arracher – et je trouve que loin d’encourager les parasites, le fait de laisser ces mauvaises herbes à cet endroit encourage en fait les créatures qui les mangent ! Laissez cependant une ou deux plantes de souci et de tagète à semer – vous en aurez ainsi pour l’année prochaine. &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Holding infinity in the palm of my hand' once more.....&#13 ;
Il y a quelques années, un auditeur a appelé après notre émission de radio du mois d’août pour dire que cela ressemblait plus au Gerry Kelly Food Show qu’au Late Lunch Show, car nous avions littéralement mangé dans les tunnels ! Je pense que c’est la raison pour laquelle Gerry a suggéré de changer le titre en « From Tunnel to Table » il y a quelques années et de faire un peu de cuisine aussi – ou plutôt son producteur intelligent l’a fait ! Mais les polytunnels ne se contentent pas de produire de la nourriture pour nous. Les « pépinières de papillons » à orties que j’ai montrées à Gerry dans les coins des tunnels plus tôt dans l’année ont à nouveau produit leur récolte annuelle de papillons. Je les aime tellement – ils sont magiques, et si bons pour l’âme ! Il y a eu une succession de dames peintes, de divers fritillaires, de paons et de tortues – et maintenant, depuis une semaine environ, beaucoup d’amiraux rouges ont éclos. Ils voltigent maintenant dans les tunnels, profitant de tout le nectar des fleurs. Ils n’ont cessé de se poser sur nous alors que nous nous promenions l’année dernière – l’un d’entre eux a même atterri sur le micro de Gerry pendant que nous enregistrions le spectacle – un sceau d’approbation certain – j’espère que cela signifie un bon « Karma » pour nous !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Pour nous, le jardinage biologique ne consiste pas seulement à cultiver des aliments sains et sans produits chimiques !&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
Il s’agit aussi d’encourager toute la merveilleuse faune qui nous aide à le faire sans produits chimiques et à l’aider à survivre. Un jardin sain et sans produits chimiques permet d’entretenir de nombreuses vies qui comptent dans l’ensemble du réseau de la vie – et pas seulement la nôtre. Cultiver des aliments sans utiliser de pesticides qui nuisent à la nature aide à préserver l’incroyable biodiversité de la terre dans toute son incroyable richesse. Les tunnels sont une célébration si joyeuse de l’abondante générosité de la nature en cette saison. C’est la biodiversité qui a donné naissance à une belle et riche productivité &#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
En ce moment dans les tunnels avec toutes les belles couleurs des cultures et des fleurs, tant de magnifiques papillons volent partout et de joyeuses abeilles bourdonnent – c’est vraiment comme « marcher dans le pays magique de Narnia » – comme l’a si gentiment fait remarquer la journaliste de l’Irish Times Fionnuala Fallon il y a quelques années.
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
(P.S. J’aime vraiment partager avec vous mes idées originales et mes 40 ans d’expérience dans la culture et la cuisson de mes propres aliments biologiques. Merci.)&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;
&#13 ;

Cet article a été rédigé par et traduit par serre2jardin.com. Les produits sont sélectionnés de manière indépendante. Serre2jardin.com perçoit une rémunération lorsqu’un de nos lecteurs procède à l’achat en ligne d’un produit mis en avant.